Future Manufacturing (Incoming News)

May 19, 2019

Fabbaloo

7 Tips For Attending RAPID + TCT 2019

A typical vendor booth at the RAPID + TCT trade show [Source: Fabbaloo]

A typical vendor booth at the RAPID + TCT trade show [Source: Fabbaloo]

...

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by General Fabb at May 19, 2019 03:22 PM

3D Print.com

3D Printing News Briefs: May 19, 2019

We’ve got business news and materials news for your weekend, just ahead of next week’s massive RAPID + TCT show. 3D Hubs and AM Ventures are both opening new offices,...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 19, 2019 07:08 AM

May 18, 2019

Fabbaloo

To RAPID + TCT We Go

Inside RAPID + TCT 2018, in Texas [Image: Fabbaloo]

Inside RAPID + TCT 2018, in Texas [Image: Fabbaloo]

RAPID + TCT 2019 is coming...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 18, 2019 03:49 PM

Terry Wohlers

DfAM in Germany

Design for additive manufacturing (DfAM) is not easy. That’s why we have been offering DfAM courses since 2015. Our first two were for NASA Marshal Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. We have since conducted courses in other parts of the U.S., as well as in Australia, Belgium, Canada, and South Africa. Our most recent course was held with Protolabs 2.5 weeks ago near Raleigh, North Carolina. It could not have gone much better.

Our first DfAM course in Germany will occur next month in cooperation with Airbus and ZAL Center of Applied Aeronautical Research. ZAL is hosting the event in Hamburg and we are very excited about it. Already, people from many countries in Europe and North America have registered to attend.

Other DfAM courses are being planned. Our second annual Design at Elevation DfAM course is September 2019 in Frisco, Colorado. Elevation: 2,774 meters (9,097 feet). Attend the course in Hamburg, but if you cannot, visit the beautiful Rocky Mountains of Colorado in September—the most colorful month of the year.

by Terry Wohlers at May 18, 2019 11:33 AM

3D Print.com

The 3D Printing Challenge: A Call for Ideas on How to 3D Print Our Way Out of the End of the World

As each day progresses, more and more people seem to conclude that our planet is heading for disaster. While a substantial segment of the world’s population remains blissfully unaware or...

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by Joris Peels at May 18, 2019 08:44 AM

May 17, 2019

3D Print.com

Maker and Veteran Tim O’Sullivan Completes Third Life-Size 3D Printed Movie Character Suit

A project that began as an ambitious therapeutic task for military veteran Tim O’Sullivan after he returned home wounded from combat has evolved into something so much greater. In 2016,...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 17, 2019 08:46 PM

Interview with Zach Kaplan of Corazon Capital, mHUB and Inventables

This is a short inteview with the Founder and CEO of Inventables, Zach Kaplan. It goes into the thoughts on digital manufacturing as well as the maker movement.

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by Ese Osaghae at May 17, 2019 08:39 PM

Fabbaloo

Unnecessary 3D Prints

The entirely useless Helmet Fan [Source: Matt Benedetto]

The entirely useless Helmet Fan [Source: Matt Benedetto]

Matt Benedetto has a...

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by General Fabb at May 17, 2019 08:19 PM

3D Print.com

Interview with Shane Quinn of AddiHive On Serial Manufacturing Through 3D Printing

We got the chance to interview Shane Quinn of AddiHive, an Ireland based 3D printing company. We covered the firm before, mentioning how they wanted to bring serial production to...

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by Joris Peels at May 17, 2019 06:05 PM

Fabbaloo

3D Print Learning Series: 3D Scanning

Our learning series turns to 3D scanning [Source: Fabbaloo]

Our learning series turns to 3D scanning [Source: Fabbaloo]

This is an entry in...

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by General Fabb at May 17, 2019 05:09 PM

3D Printed Dioramas: A New Twist On An Older Process

3D printed figurines in a diorama [Source: Twindom]

3D printed figurines in a diorama [Source: Twindom]

A company found a new usage...

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by General Fabb at May 17, 2019 01:34 PM

3D Print.com

Wikifactory Launches Beta: Social Platform for Collaborative Product Development

Rapid prototyping was the first really big application for 3D printing, as it allows product developers to quickly get a realistic representation of their idea at the earliest stages of...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 17, 2019 01:00 PM

Fabbaloo

From Design Database Shards Come Great Products

Data shards [Source: Onshape]

Data shards [Source: Onshape]

For prospective and current users, there is no...

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by ENGINEERING.com at May 17, 2019 10:44 AM

3D Print.com

The Entrepreneurial and Maker Community

This is a short article on the maker movement, entrepreneurial activity, and the global market economy as a whole. The means of production are important for any future economy, and makers may have...

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by Ese Osaghae at May 17, 2019 09:34 AM

Bioprinting for Bone Regeneration with Nanofiber Coated Tubular Scaffolds

Researchers from both Mexico and Costa Rica have joined efforts to further research into bone regeneration via bioprinting, allowing doctors and surgeons to create patient-specific scaffolds for...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 17, 2019 08:58 AM

3D Platform To Offer New 3D Printing Platforms, Processes, Partners

“Our continuing mission is to go beyond big.” — 3DP President, Jonathan Schroeder Over the years, 3D Platform has proven their commitment to large-scale manufacturing in the 3D printing realm,...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 17, 2019 05:52 AM

May 16, 2019

3D Print.com

US Researchers Continue to Improve 3D Printed Prosthetics for Children

US researchers from the University of Central Florida and Oregon Health and Science University have come together to review the history not only of prosthetics overall in the medical field...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 16, 2019 08:13 PM

Fabbaloo

IMTS Plans For Even More Additive Manufacturing In 2020

Crowds at IMTS 2018 [Image: Fabbaloo]

Crowds at IMTS 2018 [Image: Fabbaloo]

IMTS, the massive biennial manufacturing...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 16, 2019 07:51 PM

3D Print.com

What is the Future of 3D Printed Solar Panels?

The solar industry in the United States is booming. In the last 10 years, the industry has grown by more than 50% a year, employing more than 240,000 Americans. In...

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by Emily Folk at May 16, 2019 05:22 PM

Fabbaloo

Wabtec Welcomes Binder Jetting

[Image: GE Additive]

[Image: GE Additive]

GE Additive’s H2 binder jetting system has found another...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 16, 2019 05:13 PM

Why Is Stanley Black & Decker So Deep Into 3D Printing?

Stanley Ventures

Stanley Ventures

For some reason, power tool maker Stanley Black & Decker...

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by General Fabb at May 16, 2019 03:47 PM

3D Print.com

3D Printing News Briefs: May 16, 2019

We’ve got plenty of business news for you in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, starting with Additive Manufacturing Technologies’ impressive growth as of late. ExOne has announced a...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 16, 2019 02:53 PM

Fabbaloo

The ADAM Project: A 3D Printed Bone Service

We’ve just learned of a new venture seeking to simplify access to 3D printed bones: The ADAM...

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by General Fabb at May 16, 2019 01:38 PM

iMaterialise

Solving a Real 3D “Puzzle”

With decades of experience in puzzle making, Oskar van Deventer has been designing some of the most challenging and intricate 3D puzzles. He’ll use anything from computer-aided design programs to nail polish to make his vision come to life. He walked us through his design process and gave insights into some of his upcoming projects.

Oskar van Deventer has been designing and creating puzzles for more than 40 years. He opted for wood when he first started out in 1978, which is a good choice of material to work with when creating cubic puzzles. He found it more difficult to do different shapes, however, and moved on to a plastic material that made it easier to design other categories of puzzles — but it didn’t quite cut the mustard either.

When 3D printing came along, it completely changed puzzle making for Oskar: all of a sudden, the limitations he’d encountered were gone. For him, the technology has enabled so much more in terms of puzzle creation and design options.

Loopy Twist © Oskar van Deventer

Loopy Twist © Oskar van Deventer

Designing puzzles requires serious geometry, especially when designing a puzzle with numerous faces. Using a computer-aided design program helps puzzle creators such as Oskar calculate all of the angles correctly.

“I draw a pentagon and some triangles, and the CAD program does everything else for me,” Oskar tells us. “It’s the CAD program that makes it fairly easy to first prototype on the computer and once the design is good enough, I print it.”

When he’s drawing a twisty puzzle model in Rhinoceros 3D, Oskar starts with the geometry and works on a sphere: “Using one larger sphere, I put a lot of smaller circles on the sphere so that when you move it, it’s a rotation of one of the circles,” he explains.

Working from those curves, he then hones in on designing the smaller pieces. It begins with a sharp outline of the corner piece, followed by closing everything by rounding out the edges.

Then it is meshed for export (a CAD command for polyhedral objects), and ready to be sent to i.materialise.

“When you’re sending the design to i.materialise, it has to be in a neat cage,” he said. “So, the next step in the design process is to develop a cage; I create some blocks for that purpose and I label the cage “twisty ring” for the puzzle. The cage includes all of the parts for the puzzle.”

Jumble Cloud © Oskar van Deventer

Jumble Cloud © Oskar van Deventer

Jumble Cloud © Oskar van Deventer

Puzzle pro tip: Nail polish

Once it is uploaded to the i.materialise platform, it takes about 1.5 week to 2 weeks for the prototype to be ready. “Developing a prototype like this is extremely fast compared to what existed in the past,” Oskar says.

Little post-production is required for a twisty ring puzzle. Oskar’s 3D material of choice is polyamide: it is both flexible and affordable. When assembling the puzzle, the polyamide material is not completely smooth, as in, the parts are stuck together and need to be twisted to get them moving. He then cuts out the sticker designs to add color to the different faces of the puzzle.

“I use silicone lubricant – the same spray you use for a bicycle –  I soak the pieces with the spray and break them in to make sure the puzzle turns smoothly,” Oskar explains. Because the combination of the silicone spray and the nylon material makes it hard for the stickers to stick, Oskar has found a clever workaround: he uses a nail polish primer and a hot iron to make his colored stickers adhere better.

Hollow Skewb © Oskar van Deventer

Hollow Skewb © Oskar van Deventer

What can we look forward to next?

Oskar van Deventer

Oskar van Deventer

You would think that after 40 years of puzzle making, the flux of ideas would start to dwindle, but that is not the case for Oskar.

“The problem for me is not a matter of having too few ideas; it’s a matter of which project is exciting enough and having sufficient time to work on it,” he tells us. “There’s a project that I’m currently doing that is a twisty puzzle with 12 axes in a semi-random pattern. That one is next on my list; we have been working on it since last year.”

“I recently discovered that i.materialise does great dye work,” he adds. One of his small-scale productions is a puzzle ring (called the Rainbow Ring), for which i.materialise did all the 3D printing and the dye work.

“It saved me a lot of effort, and the dye work is very consistent,” Oskar says. He plans to give the rings away as gifts at an upcoming International Puzzle Party. The event is invite-only, and location and date are secret, so if you are one of the lucky few to be in-the-know and score one of Oskar’s puzzles, we are excited to hear about it and see what the puzzle looks like. Tag us on social media with #imaterialise to share the experience!

You can find out more about Oskar’s work on his website as well as our previous interview with him in which we discussed his amazing design for a supersized Rubik’s cube. Oskar’s designs can be purchased via his i.mat shop.

When you’re ready to start creating your own 3D puzzles, simply upload your 3D model to our online 3D printing service and choose from lots of high-quality materials, colors and finishes .

We love seeing what our community gets up to. Tag us on social media with #imaterialise for a chance to get featured!

by molly at May 16, 2019 12:40 PM

3D Print.com

nScrypt Develops In Situ 3D Printing Inspection System

nScrypt, headquartered in Orlando, Florida, wants to see 3D printing operations running at their full potential. In high-performance industrial atmospheres, that means heavy monitoring to ensure any...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 16, 2019 12:07 PM

Fabbaloo

Engineering.COM 3D Printing

Waiting for Xerox's 3D Printing Play

Liquid metal 3D printing at Xerox. (Image courtesy of Fabbaloo.) As industrial interest in 3D printing grows exponentially, new players are sure to arrive. One of them is likely to be Xerox. We’ve known, officially, for a few months, that Xerox intends on entering the 3D print space in a big way. Their CEO released a three-year roadmap for Xerox to participate in the industry, and it covers many aspects. A curious post on their website reveals a bit more about Xerox’s 3D print...

by Fabbaloo at May 16, 2019 08:12 AM

3D Print.com

3D Printing as an Industrial Process

Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, took its first steps in Brazil in the 1990s and is finally reaching the exposure it deserves, not only as a prototyping resource but also...

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by Hellen Souza at May 16, 2019 08:00 AM

May 15, 2019

3D Print.com

Somos PerFORM HW: Royal DSM Develops New Material for Origin 3D Printing System

While 3D printing users may often enjoy squirreling themselves away in their workshops or labs, spending hours tinkering just to see what they can come up with next, the industry...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 15, 2019 10:05 PM

University of Mississippi: How to Trace 3D Printed Guns for Forensic Analysis

Parker Riley Ball is a thesis student at the University of Mississippi, exploring some complex areas regarding 3D printing, outlined in ‘Development of a Dart-Mass Spectral Database for 3D Printed...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 15, 2019 08:19 PM

Zac Posen, GE Additive, and Protolabs Partnered to Make 3D Printed High-Fashion Collection for 2019 Met Gala

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute fundraiser event, better known as the Met Gala, has been referred to as the Oscars of the East Coast. This highly exclusive event heralds the...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 15, 2019 08:17 PM

Industry Experts Interview Naomi Kaempfer

Naomi Kaempfer Naomi Kaempfer is the Creative Director of Art, Fashion and Design for Stratasys. She has a wide background of experience within the 3D printing and fashion realm. Kaempfer specialises...

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by Ese Osaghae at May 15, 2019 08:14 PM

Fabbaloo

Ëk úâžÔœ¢·¬×b¶*'jUÔÂ'½ë-™éí

A 3D printer farm at AstroPrint [Source: AstroPrint]

A 3D printer farm at AstroPrint [Source: AstroPrint]

AstroPrint has...

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by General Fabb at May 15, 2019 07:57 PM

Snapmaker Raises Huge Amount On Kickstarter

The Snapmaker multi-tool 3D printer [Source: Kickstarter]

The Snapmaker multi-tool 3D printer [Source: Kickstarter]

Desktop multi-tool 3D...

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by General Fabb at May 15, 2019 04:37 PM

Milling Around

John Saunders Talks Vises

John Saunders from NYC CNC talks tips and tricks in the world of vises ...

by John Saunders at May 15, 2019 03:30 PM

3D Print.com

Thesis Student Creates Business Case for Desktop 3D Printing E-Cigarette Cases

Thesis student Calvin Smith, at Minnesota State University, brings up a topic most 3D printing enthusiasts and users should be interested in as he explores the limits—and endless possibilities— of...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 15, 2019 03:02 PM

Fabbaloo

From The Ashes: CRP And Energica Rebuild For MotoE

Rebuilding the Ego Corsa [Image: CRP Group]

Rebuilding the Ego Corsa [Image: CRP Group]

CRP helps Energica race to the...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 15, 2019 02:49 PM

3D Print.com

Patented Metals with Extremely High Carbide Content

Metal materials with remarkable properties. This has been the focus of Swedish company VBN Components since the very start. In the middle of the financial crisis in 2008, VBN saw the opportunity to...

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by Joris Peels at May 15, 2019 01:56 PM

Fabbaloo

Engineering.COM 3D Printing

Realizing 3D Printing’s Potential via Automated Post-Processing Tech

As the 3D printing space continues to transform into something that fits into industrial factory settings, we’ve seen materials expand, systems improve, and a trend toward automation. What has so far seemed to be the missing piece is an equal improvement in post-processing technologies. One company looking to address that gap is Sheffield, UK-based Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT), which has developed a technology for modifying the surface area of a wide range of polymers, spe...

by Michael Molitch-Hou at May 15, 2019 10:11 AM

Sculpteo

3D Print.com

German Aerospace Center: Creating 3D Printed Polymer Antennas for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Systems

Thesis student Jan Reifenhäuser at the Koblenz University of Applied Sciences explores the uses of 3D printing in creating improved antennas for multiple applications, outlined in ‘Investigation of a...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 15, 2019 08:03 AM

3D & 4D DLP Printing with Functionally Graded Materials

In ‘Grayscale digital light processing 3D printing for highly functionally graded materials,’ Chinese researchers make it clear that 3D printing has a long way to go for producing excellence in parts...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 15, 2019 07:28 AM

Ponoko

Creating the VFD MagiClock Enclosure

Why Magictale Electronics Chose Laser Cutting To Create Just The Right Fit

Go to any thrift store, and you’ll find all kinds of electronic gadgetry just ripe for the picking…of parts, that is, for your next engineering project build. Or if you’re like Dmitry Pakhomenko, you might find a discarded DVD player in the street, free for the taking. That’s when he and his team at Magictale Electronics got creative about what they could build.

The post Creating the VFD MagiClock Enclosure appeared first on Ponoko.

by Lisa Horn at May 15, 2019 04:36 AM

May 14, 2019

3D Print.com

An Indian Bioprinting Startup is Working on 3D Printed ‘Liquid Cornea’ for Corneal Grafts

In the last few years, there has been a continuous growth of bioprinting companies around the world, probably because the medical field is one of the most exciting industries taking advantage of 3D...

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by Vanesa Listek at May 14, 2019 09:31 PM

Fabbaloo

Health Canada Issues Guidance On 3D Printed Implants

3D printed medical implants [Source: Fabbaloo]

3D printed medical implants [Source: Fabbaloo]

Health Canada has issued...

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by General Fabb at May 14, 2019 08:08 PM

3D Print.com

University of Pittsburgh Develops Depowdering Machine for Metal Printing

The University of Pittsburgh has developed a depowdering solution for metal 3D printers that could significantly reduce the cost of 3D printed metal parts. Lead by Professor Albert To, a team of...

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by Joris Peels at May 14, 2019 05:15 PM

Fabbaloo

Sintratec S2 SLS 3D Printing System Ready For Its US Debut At RAPID + TCT

Ergonomic system solution for professional 3D printing: The Sintratec S2 consists of three main modules and is expandable with different additional modules, as required. [Image source: Sintratec Ltd.]

Ergonomic system solution for professional 3D printing: The Sintratec S2 consists of three main modules and is...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 14, 2019 04:24 PM

3D Print.com

The Rise of Compact Industrial Metal 3D Printers

Metal additive manufacturing continues to be one of the most influential next-generation technologies. While metal 3D printing is a hot topic in the industry, most of the focus has been on...

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by Kristin Mulherin at May 14, 2019 04:10 PM

Fabbaloo

Sintavia Opens Massive Advanced Manufacturing Plant

Sintavia’s new manufacturing facility in Florida [Source: Sintavia]

Sintavia’s new manufacturing facility in Florida [Source: Sintavia]

...

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by General Fabb at May 14, 2019 03:41 PM

The Prusa Bear Upgrade

The Prusa Bear Upgrade [Source: Thingiverse]

The Prusa Bear Upgrade [Source: Thingiverse]

There’s an exciting upgrade for...

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by General Fabb at May 14, 2019 02:33 PM

3D Print.com

China: 3D Printing Customized Meshes for Separating Oil and Water

Researchers from China are trying to refine mesh fabrication for exercises such as separating oil from water, with their recent findings published in ‘3D Printing of an Oil/Water Mixture Separator...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 14, 2019 12:00 PM

Collaborative Makerspace Network NextFab is Celebrating Ten Years of Business in Philadelphia

Collaborative Philadelphia-based workspace NextFab isn’t just made up of one location, but is actually a regional network of makerspaces and business incubators, where artisans, hardware...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 14, 2019 11:38 AM

Fabbaloo

Book of the Week: Every Tool's a Hammer

Adam Savage [Source: Amazon]

Adam Savage [Source: Amazon]

This week’s selection is “Every Tool's a...

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by General Fabb at May 14, 2019 10:31 AM

3D Print.com

Bioprinting 101 Part 18 – Pharmaceutical Testing

A pharmaceutical test can be referred to as a clinical trial or a rigorously controlled test of a new drug or a new invasive medical device on human subjects. In the United States, it is conducted...

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by Ese Osaghae at May 14, 2019 09:35 AM

May 13, 2019

3D Print.com

Xometry: On-Demand Manufacturing Marketplace Completes $50MM Funding Round

Led by Greenspring Associates, Xometry has just announced $50MM raised in equity funding. Also funding the on-demand manufacturing marketplace are: Dell Technologies Capital BMW i Ventures Foundry...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 13, 2019 09:47 PM

Fabbaloo

Waiting For Xerox

Liquid metal 3D printing at Xerox [Source: Xerox]

Liquid metal 3D printing at Xerox [Source: Xerox]

As industrial interest in 3D...

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by General Fabb at May 13, 2019 08:13 PM

3D Print.com

Join the RAPID + TCT OPENING EVENT & THOUGHT LEADERSHIP PANEL DISCUSSIONS May 20th

North America’s premier Additive Manufacturing Event RAPID + TCT will soon start on May 20th. You can still attend by registering here. The RAPID + TCT event will bring together 3D printing and...

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by Joris Peels at May 13, 2019 07:32 PM

Fabbaloo

2088 AM Jobs At RAPID + TCT Exhibitors

Additive Manufacturing job roles available at companies exhibiting at RAPID + TCT 2019 [Source: i-AMdigital]

Additive Manufacturing job roles available at companies exhibiting at RAPID + TCT 2019 [Source: i-AMdigital]

...

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by General Fabb at May 13, 2019 05:08 PM

Xometry Pulls in Another $50 Million

[Image: Xometry]

[Image: Xometry]

Xometry has announced $50 million in equity funding.

...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 13, 2019 03:34 PM

3D Print.com

Germany’s Henkel Acquires Molecule Corp., Strengthening 3D Printing & Materials Division

In another dynamic acquisition regarding the global progress of 3D printing and additive manufacturing technology, Henkel has just announced the purchase of Molecule Corp., headquartered in Concord,...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 13, 2019 03:22 PM

Inside 3D Printing Seoul Unveils this Year’s Conference Agenda

It is always best to have an opportunity to explore the latest additive manufacturing trends and technologies in one place at one time. Inside 3D Printing Seoul, taking place on June 26-28 in Seoul,...

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by YB Kim at May 13, 2019 03:21 PM

Fabbaloo

[^®v­z\’¢[›•íÃ>¸§´&¬¶)à

A very complex concrete object cast with two different soluble support materials [Source: Jacob Blitzer]

A very complex concrete object cast with two different soluble support materials [Source: Jacob Blitzer]

...

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by General Fabb at May 13, 2019 02:02 PM

3D Print.com

ROBOZE XTREME SERIES LANDS IN USA FOR RAPID+TCT IN DETROIT

The new Xtreme series will be shown for the very first time in USA from 20th to 23rd of May during the most important event in North America for 3D printing. During the exhibition, Roboze has in...

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by Ilaria Guicciardini at May 13, 2019 01:53 PM

Tomsk Polytechnic University Researchers Study Effects of Annealing in Bioprinting for Bone Regeneration

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University have recently published ‘Effect of annealing on mechanical and morphological properties of Poly(L-lactic acid)/Hydroxyapatite composite as material for 3D...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 13, 2019 12:32 PM

Fabbaloo

ë"‚z¶–yéáڝÐh¢Aè•×«

The One Hand Book Holder [Source: Thingiverse]

The One Hand Book Holder [Source: Thingiverse]

This week’s selection is the...

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by General Fabb at May 13, 2019 10:28 AM

3D Print.com

A Window Into the Brain: Transparent 3D Printed Mouse Skulls for Alzheimer’s Research

There’s a long way to go to understanding the brain. So many questions remain unanswered, yet so much research is being done, like the former U.S. administration’s ambitious project,...

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by Vanesa Listek at May 13, 2019 07:00 AM

May 12, 2019

Fabbaloo

3D Printer Filament Market Set To Grow Substantially

Stacks of 3D printer filament at a thermoplastics manufacturer [Source: Fabbaloo]

Stacks of 3D printer filament at a thermoplastics manufacturer [Source: Fabbaloo]

...

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by General Fabb at May 12, 2019 03:47 PM

3D Print.com

Case Study: A 3D Printed Patient Specific Partial Finger Prosthesis

From the University of Nebraska at Omaha, researchers Keaton Young, James E. Pierce, and James M. Zuniga explore prosthetics made via 3D printing in ‘Assessment of body-powered 3D printed...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 12, 2019 12:33 PM

May 11, 2019

Fabbaloo

3D Hubs Chooses Chicago for North American HQ

Millennium Park, Chicago [Image: 3D Hubs]

Millennium Park, Chicago [Image: 3D Hubs]

International expansions in 3D...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 11, 2019 05:31 PM

3D Print.com

The Perfect Match? Using 3D Printing and LEGO for Better Prototyping

While 3D printing has become a force in on-demand product manufacturing and a catalyst for creating many different functional objects, the technology was created to allow engineers to create rapid...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 11, 2019 08:35 AM

May 10, 2019

3D Print.com

UTK: Doctoral Student Explores the Intersection of 3D Printing, Microfluidics & Bioprinting

University of Tennessee at Knoxville Doctoral student, Peter Golden Shankles, presents his dissertation on ‘Interfacing to Biological Systems Using Microfluidics,’ discussing the popular new field of...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 10, 2019 07:52 PM

Fabbaloo

Aleph Objects Opens European HQ

Aleph Objects President and CEO Grant Flaharty: “European revenue growth in 2019 alone is expected to reach triple digits” [Image: Aleph Objects]

Aleph Objects President and CEO Grant Flaharty: “European revenue growth in 2019 alone is expected to reach...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 10, 2019 07:44 PM

Shock Wave-Proof 3D Printed Design

Shock wave-proof 3D printed surfaces [Source: Wright-Patterson AFB]

Shock wave-proof 3D printed surfaces [Source: Wright-Patterson AFB]

The US...

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by General Fabb at May 10, 2019 05:04 PM

3D Print.com

Spanish Company BRECA Health Care is at the Forefront of Medical Devices & Bioprinting

In 2018 Spain’s health care system ranked third in the world, behind Hong Kong and Singapore, and first in Europe according to a Bloomberg study, so it’s no wonder that research and development of...

View the entire article via our website.

by Vanesa Listek at May 10, 2019 03:19 PM

Fabbaloo

Direct Drive Upgrade Available for CR-10S

The Bondtech extruder / hot end upgrade for CR-10S [Source: Bondtech]

The Bondtech extruder / hot end upgrade for CR-10S [Source: Bondtech]

...

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by General Fabb at May 10, 2019 01:17 PM

3D Printing with Carbon Fiber: Tracing the Lifecycle Thread

Carbon fiber-reinforced nylon parts made using Markforged 3D-printing technology. (Image courtesy of Markforged.)

Carbon fiber-reinforced nylon parts made using Markforged 3D-printing technology. (Image courtesy of...

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by ENGINEERING.com at May 10, 2019 10:48 AM

3D Print.com

Industry Experts Interviews: Aaron Trocola on 3D Printing Fashion & Wearable Tech

This is an interview done with Aaron Trocola. He is an industrial designer with expertise in 3D printed fashion. This article goes through some of the practicality laid within fashion and 3D printing...

View the entire article via our website.

by Ese Osaghae at May 10, 2019 08:26 AM

Sculpteo

3D Print.com

Bondtech Releases Direct Drive System for Creality CR-10S 3D Printer

Established in 2014 by Martin Bondéus, Swedish company Bondtech works to improve one of the key components of 3D printers: extruders. The company develops, designs and manufactures unique dual drive...

View the entire article via our website.

by Sarah Saunders at May 10, 2019 07:33 AM

Portugal: Consortium Led By Adira Aims to do SLM 3D Printing With One Cubic Meter Build Volumes

Industrial manufacturers continue the push to integrate SLM processes into large scale projects, especially in 3D printing and additive manufacturing with metal; in fact, they are so serious about...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at May 10, 2019 06:18 AM

Nanofabrica Impacting AM Processes for Production of Micro-Optical Components

Israel’s Nanofabrica is continuing their path to superstardom for manufacturing on the micro and nanoscale. While just recently they released a new platform for micron resolution 3D printing,...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at May 10, 2019 05:21 AM

Ponoko

Good Design: Easy As Black And White

With Thicker Two-Color Acrylic Added To Both The NZ And USA Catalogs, You Have Even More Design Options

There’s something special about two-color acrylics. The contrast. The professional presentation. And no additional hand-finishing required. Previously only available in 1.5mm thickness, now 3.2mm black-on-white acrylic has been added to the NZ catalog and 3mm black-on-white and white-on-black acrylic to the USA catalog for even more design options.

Whether you’re making jewelry, electronics enclosures or signs,

The post Good Design: Easy As Black And White appeared first on Ponoko.

by Lisa Horn at May 10, 2019 12:07 AM

May 09, 2019

Fabbaloo

The peel 2 Handheld 3D Scanner

The peel 2 handheld 3D scanner [Source: peel 3D]

The peel 2 handheld 3D scanner [Source: peel 3D]

peel 3D announced the peel 2,...

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by General Fabb at May 09, 2019 08:18 PM

3D Print.com

The byFlow 3D Food Printer That Could Make Culinary Personalization Happen

byFlow has presented their new platform, byFlow Studio, that agilizes personalization, while their Focus 3D Food Printer has been helping make a change in the healthcare and food industry, as well as...

View the entire article via our website.

by Melisa Gonzalez at May 09, 2019 06:35 PM

Fabbaloo

HP’s Production-Focused Jet Fusion 5200 Series

The Jet Fusion 5200 system setup [Image: HP Inc.]

The Jet Fusion 5200 system setup [Image: HP Inc.]

Among HP’s announcements...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 09, 2019 04:17 PM

What Must 3D Systems Do To Thrive?

3D Systems needs new strategies

3D Systems needs new strategies

Given 3D Systems’ most recent financial...

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by General Fabb at May 09, 2019 02:29 PM

iMaterialise

How to Create Stunning Polyamide (SLS) Prints as a Beginner

Polyamide (SLS) is the material that offers the most freedom of design for 3D printing. It’s also the material that can be finished in the most colors. But sometimes, this is not enough to create the 3D prints of your dreams. That’s the case of Brian Wise, a 3D printing beginner who successfully finished his first 3D-printed project, from sketch to painted 3D model.

Brian Wise recently graduated from college in Philadelphia with a degree in architecture and has been working as an architectural designer for a year and a half. He has enjoyed drawing and modeling since childhood. That’s why it’s no surprise that his design for a boat started with a sketch.

In this interview he explained to us what process he followed to finish his first 3D print and how he painted the printed model to match it with the ideal design he had in mind.

We see that you mainly work with illustrations. Why did you decide to 3D print a model of the boat?

When I was in school, our final design studio had access to a 3D printer, but due to the direction my project went, I was unable to really do anything with it, which felt like a huge missed opportunity.  Now that I’m out of school, I’ve found that I have much more free time with the absence of classes, but have lost the creative outlet that our design studio provided.

I tried my hand at a few miscellaneous crafts before starting to get really interested in the idea of 3D printing. Of course, the possibilities of 3D printing are endless, so the process of bringing a 2D drawing to life gave me some focus for this experiment.

Is this your first experience with 3D printing?

This is indeed my very first print. I looked heavily into acquiring my own 3D printer but was hesitant to purchase plastic-based printers due to wanting to really engage in fine detail and their tendency to visibly layer; and I was unable to afford alternative resin-based printers. Luckily the team at i.materialise was also particularly accommodating.

What was the inspiration behind the design of the boat?

The process was rather long, though fairly straightforward. It began as an idle sketch while I was in the studio one day, inspired by the exceedingly talented Ian McQue and his fantastical flying boat and industrial paintings. The drawing sat in my sketchbook for over a year until post-graduation, when I became interested in 3D printing. I selected it after scrolling through my old Instagram posts to find an interesting object that I could reasonably model. Over the course of the next week, I 3D modeled it before sending it out to print.

Which program did you use for the 3D design?

The design was modeled in Rhino 5.0, which I had used heavily and been instructed in as a student for Architectural Visualization, and subsequently purchased only to have it sit around unused on my computer after graduating.

3D_model_design

Which material did you use and why?

I ended up printing the model in polished polyamide (SLS). I certainly didn’t have an excess of money to throw around for a hobby venture like this and was initially discouraged to the point of shelving the project after seeing some of the prices at other websites. Luckily, Polyamide was affordable, allowed for a good level of fine detail, and true to its description on the site was forgiving for a beginner in 3D printing like myself who doesn’t really have a feel for the intricacies of modeling for print. The option of the polished surface was a nice bonus to help reflect the smooth hull of the boat.

How did you paint the 3D-printed model?

I first coated the model with black spray paint and then used hobby model paints to finish it. Since I had the model printed as one solid block, it was difficult to get into nooks and crannies or to highlight details (something to keep in mind for the next 3D print). By using dry-brushing over the black undercoat, the corrugations, seams, and other tiny details were able to be preserved.

After the solid blocks of color were applied, the fine details were added such as rust and striping.  Lettering and graffiti were applied with a white gel-pen. Aside from the gel-pen, all the painting materials were from Game Workshop’s Citadel Paints, which I had used before on miniatures when I was younger.

Some of the aspects too small for 3D printing, such as the telephone pole mast and rigging, were sourced from Model Train hobby companies and added after painting.

Do you have any other 3D-printed projects for the future?

Ever since I started getting into the idea of 3D-printing, I’ve had more ideas than I can list, from scale models like the boat, to jewelry. The joy and possibility of bringing a rough idea from 2D to being able to hold it in your hand is amazing. I would love to begin looking into i.materialise’s ability to print interlocking parts to start bringing some movement and life to these creations. I certainly have plenty of sketches to choose from!

We hope that this interview inspires you to 3D print your ideas. As you can see, even a doodle can become a stunning 3D-printed piece with the right tools and 3D printing technology. If you are 3D printing on a budget like Brian, you can upload your models to our 3D printing platform once they are ready and get an instant price quote for your prints in different materials.

When you’re ready to let your own designs set sail, simply upload your 3D model to our online 3D printing service and choose from lots of high-quality materials, colors, and finishes.

We love seeing what our community gets up to. Tag us on social media with #imaterialise for a chance to get featured!

 

by Aura Farrando at May 09, 2019 01:30 PM

CutLaserCut

As digital manufacture becomes more accessible, it is changing the way we make things beyond recognition

Object 3D print sample. 
Source:

Object 3D print sample.
Source: Replicator

In January this year, the issue of internet piracy became more complex than ever. The Pirate Bay, perhaps the most well-known torrent website in the world, launched a new category called Physibles. These files for 3D printers allowed anyone with a kit-built resin printer, a laptop and internet access to manufacture their own objects…

If you can recreate a copyrighted design in a CAD application, you can share it, print it and potentially sell it too. This poses new opportunities for digital manufacture while giving companies another reason to worry about intellectual property.

In theory, the ability to pirate the physical is already there. But files in the scant selection on the Pirate Bay currently include replica feet, light switches and cowboy hats, so it’s unlikely that Games Workshop have much to worry about yet. Nonetheless, the launch of the Physibles category brought the reality of 3D printing home for many. The manufacture of a physical object is no longer something that can only be done in a factory with massive investment and weighty labour costs, it has made manufacture more immediate. The consequences for designers, architects and other creative industries is potentially revolutionary.

In a society focused on convenience, it’s perhaps no surprise that we have arrived at this point so soon. Since the first email was sent in 1971, the speed of acquisition (of information or objects) has been rapidly increasing. We travel quicker, communicate instantly and expect our entertainment to be delivered on demand. In the 17th century, Stradivari would spend up to two months crafting a violin which now sells for millions of pounds. In 2011, a copy was printed in a few hours and assembled by a violin maker in a couple of days.

MakerBot Industries Thing-O-Matic 3D Printer.

Over the last twenty years, the cost of acquiring the technology needed to print in 3D has dropped below the price of a laser printer in the mid-1980s. Although these machines are not common place yet, technology has come along leaps and bounds with the release of low cost self build kit machines like Thing-o-Matic, the Maker bot and Cubify 3D that come ready to print straight out of the box.

Cubify 3D printer.

Digital manufacture also opens doors for designers who have so far struggled to make complex objects quickly at a low cost. The technology continues to grow at a tremendous pace. Up to a few years ago 3D printers were used to print mainly with plastics, but it’s now possible to print with other materials such as nylon, paper but most notable with metal. Israel based company Objet are pushing the boundaries of mechanical prototyping, printing high resolution sophisticated product and engineering components from multiple materials. Objects that cannot be moulded or glued can now also be printed, including complex honeycomb structures.

Objet Fullcure 720 Chain - printed as a single part.
Source:

Objet Fullcure 720 Chain – printed as a single part.
Source: Objective design

Vero blue chain mail - printed as a single part.
Source:

Vero blue chain mail – printed as a single part.
Source: Objective design

The 3D printer could be the ultimate end point of the automated world as human labour becomes less valuable and less important to manufacturers. Obtaining items ‘on demand’ could arguably introduce environmental concerns and increase the disposable nature of tangible goods. The real issue for tomorrow’s technology companies will be time; the quality of items produced on your 3D printer could be less important than the convenience and speed involved in obtaining them.

Read more about digital manufacture in the Economist – The third industrial revolution

by Jamie, Claire at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Making Ideas - An awesome video on Cut Laser Cuts service to you

At the end of last year, With Associates (our brilliant web developers) set themselves the challenging task of redesigning their website every month of the past year. The objective being to experiment and learn about the ever evolving nature of the digital environment.

For the December installment, this included cutlasercut! Seeking to uncover more about the narratives of their clients business processes, With Associates along with Matt Simmonds made this sumptuous video to demonstrate the journey involved laser cutting and engraving a project with us. Hope you enjoy!

Have a browse of our services

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

94 Elements - a new film project on the human stories behind our natural elements

Last month we were lucky enough to meet filmmaker Mike paterson. Mike got in touch regarding some laser engraving he required for a film making project named 94 elements. The global project launched yesterday and tackles a very interesting human predicament – the story of human lives through the elements.

According to Mike:

“There are 94 naturally occurring elements, from Hydrogen to Plutonium. Everything we use and create is made from them. Our own bodies are mostly made from just 6 of the elements. They affect our lives in countless ways, and their stories reveal our relationship with our resources and the patterns of our economies.”

The aim of the project is to create a collection of 4-7 minute documented videos of human stories highlighting the way we extract or use one element. The films will be made by a mixture of award-winning filmmakers and new talent on the filmmaking scene.

94 elements is currently sourcing funding, where you can contribute through Indiegogo. The target they aim to reach is $62k (or more!) in 56 days!

Filmmakers are also invited to pitch their ideas. The deadline for this is in 4 weeks – Visit here and click on ‘Pitch you films’ for details on how to submit ideas.

Whilst the projects key focus is on the human relationships we have with our natural elements it also brings to light a more alarming issue regarding the rate in which we consume these resources. With a recent shift towards digital manufacturing increasing the speed in which we make product components and the surge in the manufacture of new technological devices, more and more elements are being consumed.

Mike suggests that a mobile phone contains more than 40 elements and will probably all end up in landfill. These ‘on demand’ products could arguably introduce environmental concerns for the future generations. The question of how we work towards recycling our natural elements is a big concern.

See more about the project

Laser engraved wood blocks for trailer:

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Panel Joinery techniques adapted for CNC routing and laser cutting via MAKE Magazine

Sean Ragan from MAKE Magazine has written this useful article detailing adapted methods of traditional flat panel joining techniques for the laser cutters and CNC routers. A great resource which we strongly advise reading if you’re looking to make models, project enclosures, sculptures, furniture, or any other cool stuff to be assembled from laser cut parts.

Browse the joining techniques»

See how to setup a drawing for laser cutting»

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Reactor - A clever software that converts images into patterns for laser engraving

Software developer Jason Dorie has created this nice little tool to create a pattern based on the results of a reaction-diffusion system from any image.

cnc-ed image on white veneered wood.

cnc-ed image on white veneered wood.

The program is very easy to use. The nicest thing about it is the way it “grows” your image into the pattern. You simply drop your file into the software and the pattern will gradually reveal itself. When you are happy with how it looks you simple stop the process.

Pattern grows

Pattern grows

Becomes more dense

Becomes more dense

Image emerges before your eyes!

Image emerges before your eyes!

Although some larger images can take quite long time to process (particularly those with a lot of white tones) it’s a great tool for messing around with. The newest version of Reactor also allows you to negate the image (making the dots white instead of black) and to save a high quality jpeg file. Perfect for taking into illustrator and vector tracing. Jason cut this piece of artwork on a CNC machine but I can see some great applications here for laser cutting and engraving; bespoke engraved art or unique graffiti stencils spring to mind. Definitely worth a bit of experimentation. Hopefully version 3 will include the functionality to export to vectors directly.

Download reactor

Reactor is only Windows executables, and require the Microsoft .NET framework, V3.5. If you have difficulty running them, try installing the framework from here: http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=2

See how patterns could be raster engraved

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Printing with laser engraved lino blocks could rival traditional methods like screen printing

Lino cutting by hand is typically quite a time consuming process. Painstakingly gouging out those pre-marked areas can get a little frustrating especially at large sizes. But did you know lino cuts can also be made on the laser cutter and in a fraction of the time?

Laser engraved lino cut

Laser engraved lino cut

Artist Patrick Collier has used raster laser engraving as a method for making prints for much of his work and in some cases, it has replaced traditional print methods (including screen printing) as his favoured application. We caught up with Patrick to find out more about the key benefits of using lasers with lino and how the process has influenced his work:

“A fundamental aspect of my practice is exploring new ideas and ways of making. I began experimenting with laser engraving as an alternative method of reproducing the work I make in Adobe Illustrator.

For a long time I had screen printed my designs and although I still work with screen printing, it requires a lot of preparation, materials and equipment. By contrast, lino printing is an incredible basic process and requires far less equipment, preparation and time. Once a design is cut from lino all you need is some ink, a brayer (a roller) and something to print on.

Engraving into the lino

Engraving into the lino

Brayer

Brayer

Inked up lino block

Inked up lino block

Creating an image for laser engraving is the point where I began my use of halftone pattern fills. The reason being that I wanted to reduce each of my designs to a single part and forego the use of multiple plates or screens. This experiment has had a lasting impact on the visual style of my work. The halftone patterns I use comprise of very small dots but I’ve found it’s possible to achieve a lot of detail through printing with laser etched surfaces. The level of detail is comparable with screen printing and making laser engraved lino is also a great way for re-producing photographic images.

Hand pressed prints

Hand pressed prints

One main difference in the lino printing application comes in the way pressure is applied to make the print. Whereas screen prints are produced by forcing ink through a mesh, lino printing involves directing inking the relief surface and impressing it to paper, fabric or any other material. Lino can be printed with a press or by hand. I prefer to make my prints by hand, giving them a rougher quality.
A smoother consistent print finish is also achievable with a press.

A smoother consistent print finish is also achievable with a press.

Engraved lino details

Engraved lino details

Hand pressed print

Hand pressed print

Halftone dot details

Halftone dot details

Machine pressed print

Machine pressed print

One other main advantage is the sizes of the prints you can achieve. On a large laser bed it’s possible to engrave lino cuts up to A0 size. Doing something like this by hand would take days and on the laser it takes a lot less time. It’s also possible to print larger images in sections using a tiling effect”

See more on the raster engraving process»
See more of patricks work on Tumblr»

by Jamie, guest post by Patrick Collier at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

“Laser cut pancakes are going to be bigger than 3D printing”

'Spiral pancakes'

‘Spiral pancakes’

Back in February, we indulged in a bit of experimentation to cook pancakes on the laser cutter for pancake day. After a quite a few messy attempts, we finally cracked it. ‘Spiral pancakes’ were born! I recently discovered that this little project had become the subject of an interesting article written by Joseph Flaherty from Replicator. The blog looks closely at companies and products that build a relationship between the ‘digitalness’ of the internet and the physicality of products.

While this was seen mainly as a bit of fun, Joseph rightly identifies that these sorts of applications could be stages in the development of home manufacturing. Could tools like laser cutters revolutionize how we make stuff in the kitchen? Read the full article to find out more.

See how spiral pancakes were made in the flickr photo set.

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

A workshop visit from Ajojo, laser engraved aluminium sampling

When exploring finishes for the packaging for their new ‘Make your mark’ pen design, creative company Ajojo got in touch keen to explore the possibilities of laser etching for their anodised aluminium cases. Ajojo like to document and share their ‘journeys’ of the experiences that inspire them in their projects, so we were more than happy to welcome them into the workshop to get a better understanding of the engraving process first hand.

We sampled a variety of anodised aluminium finishes to help them establish the best direction to pursue before the design went into production. Have a look at this photoset below, all images courtesy of Ajojo. ‘Make your Mark’, is currently seeking backers on Kickstarter and we’d urge you to make a pledge to join them in the final stage of their journey.

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Laser cutting trends from Fashion week AW/2012

Hemyca AW/12 collection

Hemyca AW/12 collection

With London fashion week A/W all done and dusted for another year it’s safe to say that there was a lot of amazing stuff on show! All the authoritative blogs and trend writers have been dishing out the praises on the many collections on show, reinforcing London again as hotspot for creativity in the fashion industry.

Again this season, as with Spring summer 11 show textile laser cutting seemed to be a common trend integrated more in detailing of garments mostly in the form of mesh like shapes. Pillow magazine picked up on this too in an earlier blog post mentioning that “ Laser-cut mesh detail and oversized netting are easily the biggest trends so far.”

Here then is a selection of some of the key designers who used laser cutting within their collections. (Of course including some cut laser cut clients.)

 Hemyca  “A World of Glass” AW12
Hemyca “A World of Glass” AW12

Duly noted as “the brightest and most directional fashion brand in the UK” – Fashion press week awards, top clients Hemyca’s collection “A World of Glass” AW/12 was something of a show stopper. The girls mentioned there was a great reaction to their pieces with lots of comments made about the superior quality of each item.

Laser cutting was used to make leather meshes that were overlaid on softer brocade fabrics. According to Myra, “the designs are like armour, moulding to and protecting the body.”Great to work with such bright talent!

Alice Temperley

Alice Temperley

Alices collection was described as a “celebration of opulence” and was inspired by eighteenth century religious paintings and russian influences. Her day dresses incorporated a geometric laser-cut repeat pattern on purple taffeta fabric to match the lace ankle boots beneath.

Dion lee

Dion lee

Dion showed a 15 piece collection involving a relationship sculptural suiting. Laser cut fabric panels were fused with mesh panelling. His inspiration for piece was his lungs, and the way air moves through them.

Negarin - laser cut belt

Negarin – laser cut belt

Negarin also exhibited some lovely laser cut detailing at New York fashion week A/W 12
This laser cut leather belt was part of an accessories project designed by Solmi Kim (Design Assistant/CAD designer for Negarin London) for the The Lasercut collection included iPad covers, shoppers and clothing.)

Belt designed by Solmi Kim
Manufactured by Tura
Lasercut by Cut Laser Cut

You can see how these were cut over in flickr.

Jewellery by Luca Romanyi Ada Zanditon

Jewellery by Luca Romanyi Ada Zanditon

We also spotted these chunky pieces of laser cut jewellery by Luca Romanyi and Ada Zanditon made from laser cut and engraved off-cuts of reclaimed walnut and decorated with left-over pieces of leather from their clothing collection.

See more on our laser cutting and engraving service for the fashion industry»

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

CLC laser cuts wedding invitations for Kirstie's Vintage Homes TV Show

Hand cutting paper has become a popular craft lately particularly amongst illustrators. Whilst methods vary, details are generally cut into sheets of paper using a pair of scissors or a scalpel. Hand drawings can be easily duplicated to form templates for cutting. Some of the designs that we have seen are so mind blowingingly intricate it comes at quite a shock when you hear that they have been hand crafted. Hina Aoyama’s beautiful work springs to mind. She describes the process of creating these delicate pieces as “stress relieving.” Whilst we admire the dedication and persistence of this craft, laser cutting your paper designs is a timesaving alternative.

Kirstie Allsopp’s production company Raise The Roof recently got in touch for this reason. Kirstie’s Vintage Homes, a new series on Channel 4 as the name suggests, helps people “turn their houses into homes, with a bit of vintage inspiration, their own bare hands, and that little bit of homemade magic.”

For last nights episode ‘bare hands’ were initially used to create wedding invitations – a simple paper cut card design that definitely had that vintage look! A hand drawing was used as a template to scalpel out the white negative space between the lettering from a cream card.

The realisation that producing more than 80 invites would take literally hours and hours of scapeling prompted an alternative solution for production – laser cutting! Converting a hand drawing to a vector drawing is actually a fairly straightforward exercise. A scanned image is taken into Adobe Illustrator and Live Traced

The vectors are then converted to outlines ready for cutting. The laser will follow the paths of the vector to cut. A design that previously would take up to an hour to produce just one will now take a few minutes on the laser.

The crispness of the cut is also surprisingly similar to a hand cut design. Whilst the laser is delicately burning through the card to cut, burn marks are minimal and in most cases unnoticeable. Definitely a worthy timesaving alternative to hand cutting when producing volumes of a single design are involved.

To find out more about this technique feel free to get in touch.

See more from Kirsties Vintage Homes scrapbook›

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

7 Surprisingly Practical Uses for a 3D Printer

In the fields of health, construction, and even space travel, some truly amazing things are being done with this still relatively new and developing technology. Here are just seven surprising uses for a 3D printer courtesy of Online Business Degree

1. Vintage car parts

Vintage car lovers are sometimes stuck with a vehicle that will no longer run because a single part is broken, needs to be replaced, and was discontinued back in 1910. Replacement parts for antique cars often no longer exist, and getting a machinist to make one from scratch can involve a lot of trial and error and will cost you a lot of money. Using a 3D scanner, like the one made by NextEngine , allows you to scan a part that needs to be replaced, and then print a plastic or, depending on the printer, metal replacement part.

2. Body Organs

Organovo is the first company to create a bioprinter which replaces the ink drops of a printer with (and this is freaky) human cells. Although this technology is still at least five years away from clinical testing, researchers believe it will one day be possible to use an adult’s stem cells to print and grow a kidney, heart valve, or pair of lungs. 3D printing with cells also has the potential to build tubes for blood vessels, cartilage for joints, and patches of skin and muscle.

3. Artificial limbs

The San Francisco-based Bespoke Innovations is using 3D printers to produce assembled and functioning artificial limbs for a much lower cost than what has been previously available. Thanks to scanning and digital modeling technology, a prosthetic limb can be customized to suit the body and particular needs of the recipient.

4. Space mission

Getting a replacement part from planet Earth to an orbiting space station, or a rover on Mars, is not only technically challenging, it also costs a whole lot of money. 3D printers may soon allow astronauts and scientists in space to resupply as needed, possibly using, if on the moon, natural material from the moon’s surface in combination with a binding agent to create whatever part is needed.

5. Structurally sound houses

Is it possible to build an earthquake-proof building? Construction companies may one day be able to use an experimental technology called ‘Contour Crafting,’ which combines Geographic Information System data with 3D printing, to build and rebuild structurally strong buildings in earthquake-prone locations like Haiti. The cost would be a fraction of what traditional construction companies currently charge. The Italian designer Enrico Kini is working toward using large scale 3D printing technology to produce entire, two-floor stone buildings made of sand and an inorganic, liquid binding agent.

6. Prosthetic jaw

Researchers in Belgium and the Netherlands recently collaborated with a company that makes implants and a manufacturer of metal additives to create a prosthetic jaw for a patient suffering from a severe infection of most of her mandible. The replacement jaw was created using a 3D printer and powdered titanium, instead of plastic, to sculpt the jaw. A bioceramic coating was applied so that the patient’s body would not reject the implant.

7. Haute couture shoes

This may seem a little silly after talking about space travel, prosthetic limbs, and earthquake-proof buildings, but yes, 3D printing technology is being used to produce some pretty fancy ladies footwear. Designer Mary Huang’s strvct 3D printed shoe collection is a collection of web-like, completely wearable shoes, that will set you back £560.00 a pair. Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from buying a 3D printer, for less than that amount, and taking a shot at printing up your own pair of haute couture shoes.

Original source: 7 surprisingly practical uses for a 3D Printer

by Online Business Degree at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

3D4D challenge - Transformational ideas that use 3D printing for the developing world

Techfortrade, launched in 2011 with a mission to alleviate poverty through the use of developing technologies. Early in their research, they considered the role that technology would play in helping small rural producers to access markets for their produce. The 3d4d Challenge was born from this concept and aims to find transformational uses for 3D printing technologies that deliver real social benefit in the developing world.

Last week the 7 finalists were announced where each contestants will then be invited to give a presentation of their projects to selected guests at the 3D print show on the 19th october.


The finalists include:

Re-Char WOOF (Washington Open Object Fabricators), Bethany Weeks and Luke Iseman, USA
An off-grid 3D printing system, which recycles plastic bags to produce tools for local farmers.

*Boris Kogan, Israel/US *
A small scale, easy-to-manufacture and assemble robotic greenhouse which will enable local communities to produce good food with ease, even in the most difficult environmental conditions.

Climate Connected Benefit Society, ColaLights, Edmund Bell-King and Cornell Jackson, UK
Solar lamps created from used plastic Coke bottles using 3D printed ‘bottle caps’ and attachments for the charger, battery and PCB components. These lights will replace expensive and dangerous kerosene ones to use in rural areas throughout India.

Fripp Design and Research, Tom Fripp and Steve Roberts, UK
The use of 3D printing technology to enable the developing world to rapidly manufacture soft tissue prosthesis, at minimal expense.

The EN3D Project, JF Brandon, Canada
A simple, 3D printed solar tracker that is more efficient, cheaper and easier to manufacture than existing models, which will provide sustainable solar electricity to local communities.

Roy Ombatti, Kenya
Specially designed 3D printed shoes produced from recycled plastic to be worn by individuals suffering from foot deformities due to the growing problem of jigger fly infestation – in order to prevent further deterioration.

Just 3D Printing, Suchismita and Jayant Pai, India
Providing young entrepreneurs and students access to 3D printers using material recycled from disused plastic bottles, in order to encourage innovation.

You can read more about the finalists here. Each finalist will make a short video pitch which will be available to view at the show and to the general public to vote on.


This competition is another reminder of the advances of additive technology and how computers and the internet have become a conduit for tapping into more widespread skills & innovation. The technology has already found applications in a range of industrial sectors and medical applications but techfortrade have opened up an opportunity for innovation not just from the professional sector but also from the local community fuelled by the surge of home based 3d printer users.

Applying 3d printing to the developing world is a new an exciting prospect. In an area of the world where internet based retail is still in it’s infancy, connectivity however is growing fast. Infrastructure to support this growth is also hugely undeveloped. By 2015, it is estimated that 400 million mobile phone users in Africa alone will not have electricity regularly supplied by a power grid! Asking the question how can 3d printing impact the developing world has opened up a wealth of ideas to improve the incomes and livelihoods of people in developing countries.

We look forward to seeing the pitches in October!

See more on techfortrade

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Sun Cutter - self build laser cutter that harnesses sunlight by Marcus Kayser

There’s been quite a trend recently for self build laser cutters. Fuelled mainly by Instructables laser cutter contest run back in late 2010, where participants were invited to build a laser machine from scratch with the pick of the bunch winning an Epilog Zing. The contest is rumoured to be given a second wind this year, so keep a look out!

The basic components required (such as a tube, basic plotter and optics) are also much more accessible these days and the costs are dropping year on year. Of course, these self build machines don’t really compare to the professional laser manufacturers market in terms of precision and quality, nevertheless they are interesting from a concept point of view. None more so than the Sun Cutter by Markus Kayser, a low tech, low energy laser cutter that harnesses sunlight as a laser source.

I recently re-discovered this video which was first published last year. It uses pure sunlight, focused by a ball lens, to repeatedly cut shapes in up to 0.4mm thick plywood as well as paper and card.

The project also explores the merit of analogue mechanised production that draws on the machine technology found in pre-digital machinery and automaton.

Watch the Sun cutter at work cutting some custom sunglasses!

More of the best self build laser cutters to come…

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Laser engraved steel for Melvin Galapons T.E.A.M exhibition

TEAM #5 from Melvin Galapon on Vimeo.

Regular client and uber talented graphic designer Melvin Galapon is currently exhibiting at the Kemistry Gallery over in east London. For the exhibition entitled T.E.A.M – Together Everyone Achieves More, Melvin has collaborated with some of the UK’s most exciting current illustrators and artists; Hellovon, Pomme Chan & James Dawe: “T.E.A.M explores the idea of working together to produce something more than what can be achieved alone.” On show is a rich mix of pieces produced using a variety of mediums; screen printed silk scarves and cushions, and a selection of screen prints and risoprints all exploring geometric shapes. Laser engraving was also applied in a lesser known application to produce 3 of the pieces on show.

We used a special chemical compound to permanently mark a series of stainless steel metal panels. The special compound was applied onto the steel surface prior to engraving. When processed the heat from the laser causes the engraved areas to turn black. Read about this process. Fantastically detailed result! The video above was also commissioned to document the production side of the exhibit. Well worth a visit!

Kemistry Gallery – 43 Charlotte street – London EC2A 3PD
16th August – 1st September

Laser engraved metal panels

Laser engraved metal panels

by jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

How to laser cut wood veneer for marquetry inlays

Preparing drawings to laser cut wood veneer for marquetry inlays requires more consideration than a standard laser job. You need to pay a little more attention to your dimensioning in particular the kerf made by the laser when cutting, (more on this later.)

One of our recent clients Richard Whitehead came to us with a project that demonstrates the technique perfectly and he was kind enough to share this guide which documents the process involved. See how the design unfolded from a hand drawing to a beautiful marquetry plaque.

“The first job was to scan the design and draw over it in a CAD package; I used TurboCAD for this step. I had to reinterpret the design in places to make it feasible to be made in wood.”

“I had to think about the “kerf” of the laser. Just like a saw blade, the laser wastes some material as it cuts, and if I didn’t allow for it there would be a gap between the pieces of wood.

Also, it’s not possible to make a perfectly sharp concave point in the edge of some wood, there needs to be a certain radius to allow for the width of the laser. On the other hand it’s important not to round off corners where multiple pieces meet otherwise there would be a gap.

So there was some work in rounding off sharp points where necessary. Then I transferred the design to AutoCAD and used it to trace the polygons, which I then grew by a small amount to allow for the laser kerf – you can see the light and dark polygons in yellow and red overlapping slightly:"

“Some of the rectangles of the same colour now overlap, so I spaced them apart vertically (along the grain of the wood) – I made the gap 5 mm so that the cut sheet of veneer would have some strength, being a sheet with holes in it, rather than being cut to ribbons…”

“I sent my files to Cut Laser Cut to be laser cut. The veneer comes out looking quite burnt on the rear side, but beautifully clean on the front (especially as the protected it with some tape before they cut it):”

“For the plaque I cut a piece of 19 mm plywood and glued the veneer edges on, before trimming them off with a router. I also recessed a “keyhole” hanger into the back of the wood. There were lots of fiddly bits of wood to piece together; I used masking tape to hold it all together and then glued the veneer to the front of the plywood using hot-melt glue sheet heated with a domestic iron.
The final stage was to spray wih 4 coats of acrylic laquer.

I’m really pleased with the result."

For more info on laser cutting wood or on your own marquetry project, do get in touch!

by Jamie, Richard at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

We teamed up with Diginate to explore combining laser cutting and printing

Chameleon clock

Chameleon clock

Diginate offer a print on demand service which enables you to order completely bespoke stickers and posters. They’re quite unique in that their minimum order is only one unit! Quite rare for printers. Tim and Jon from Diginate recently got in touch excited about the possibility of combining our services.

Laser cutting & engraving + printed stickers. What could we make? So many possibilities! After a fair few varied ideas, the guys at Diginate came up with a rather unique clock design, the chameleon clock. A timekeeping chameleon would sit on the clock face, chasing a wasp (the minute hand) around with his tongue (the hour hand).

After popping down to the CLC studio they returned to the diginate offices for the sticker printing and assemble. Jon documented the whole making process from vector to timekeeping masterpiece for your inspiration. Have a good browse through:

“Here’s the outer rim of our clock face being cut in walnut veneered MDF. It has already been laser engraved with the numbers, in our signature Omnes font.”

“Here’s the completed outer rim of the clockface. There is a protective adhesive paper on the surface of the wood.”

“The laser engraving is super-sharp.”

“Here’s the cut file for the clear acrylic elements of our clock.”

“And the laser cutting in action. We’ve used an intricate ‘rough’ edge to our chameleon to represent it’s scaly skin.

Once all our components had been cut (which was surprisingly quick), we returned to Diginate HQ to start the build…"

“Here’s all our parts:

“The clear acrylic has a protective film, which we removed in readiness for applying the background graphic.”

“Here’s the background window sticker graphic.”

“The window sticker is carefully applied to the back of the clock face.”

“We cut the central hole for the movement by hand so we didn’t need to perfectly align a cutout.”

“Here’s the custom cut chameleon window decal sticker. We chose a particularly fetching black and blue chameleon. What a champ.”

“Applying the window sticker to the chameleon.”

“Here’s the clear wasp window sticker. We printed a few in case we messed up the alignment.”

“Applying the wasp sticker to the minute hand.”

“Here’s the custom cut tongue window sticker for the hour hand.”

“We made it slightly oversized to avoid any alignment issues, and trimmed it with a sharp scalpel.”

“The finished acrylic components.”

“Next we applied glue to the back of the outer walnut rim…”

“And stuck it to the base.”

“The most satisfying part of the whole project.”

“Next we popped the spindle through to attach the movement.”

“And secured it in place.”

“A dab of glue onto the chameleon…”

“And fitted into place.”

Amazingly we didn’t manage to lose the addition branch pieces. Here they are slotting in.

Amazingly we didn’t manage to lose the addition branch pieces. Here they are slotting in.

“Then all we had to do was pop the hands on, stick a battery into the movement, and our chameleon clock is in action!

Here’s the finished clock:"

Thanks to Tim and Jon for the images and for documenting the process.

Check out Diginates website for their full range of bespoke printing services!

by Jamie, Jon from Diginate at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Laser cutting fabric for Topmans exclusive new Spring / Summer 2013 Collection

Last month CLC were a bit busier than usual laser cutting fabric for Topmans brand new Spring / Summer Collection 2013 that premiered this month with an exclusive show.

Taking on a ‘West coast boy’ style, the collection adopted an assorted mix of 80’s New York tailoring and a west coast skater/surfer style. The show included a mix of abstract floral graphic prints, loose-gauge knits and organza tees. Laser cut polka dot details were used though out on the loose fitting block color jackets and suede bomber jackets which were layered over one another.

All images ©

All images © The Fashionisto 2012

It was really exciting to laser cut work for such a high calibre project. Big shout out to Michael Nurse and Ian Waller who liased with our team throughout.

You can watch a recording of the show as it was streamed live here.

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Cut Laser Cut are proud contributors for the Heatherwick Studio exhibition: Designing the extraordinary

UK Pavilion Seed Cathedral, Shanghai Expo China 2010 © Iwan Baan

UK Pavilion Seed Cathedral, Shanghai Expo China 2010 © Iwan Baan

We were delighted to be involved in the new Heatherwick Studio exhibition: Designing the Extraordinary, currently on show at the V&A museum. Working alongside Here Design, we were responsible for laser engraving the entire collection of museum signage panels to support the wonderful array of work on show.

This solo exhibition features a dense amount of prototypes, experiments, material samples as well as finished works and models from some recent projects including the UK Pavillion seed cathedral in Shanghai expo china 2010.

Whilst the exhibit occupies one of the smaller spaces of the V&A (the Porter Gallery), you won’t be disappointed with the volume and variety of work on show. Works from the last two decades are arranged in clusters that show similar developmental processes rather than by creative discipline or chronology. Examples of architecture, sculpture, engineering, furniture and product design are intertwined. The sense you get from this is that you are walking through the studio’s working space, taking a peek at the design processes.

Heatherwick studios working methods are evident even before entry. A brilliant contraption conceived to dispense the exhibition guide outside the gallery is less designed and more a response to the forms of the large printed paper rolls as they come from the printers. The dispenser allows you to roll and tear off your own guide at will. It expresses more the “paperness” of guides in a less formal way than a conventional gallery booklet.

The exhibition is the climax of the V&A series which celebrates the best in british design. For some, Heatherwick is a lesser known name. This exhibition will give an insight into the thriving design studio and his presence in the british design mainstream, not least for his recent design of the famous routemaster bus but also for a comission by Danny Bolye to design the cauldron for the London Olympic opening ceremony. For many who are familiar with his work, it adds a deeper understanding into his design methods and processes. We highly recommend a visit!

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Top clients Shotopop win European Design Award for campaign! Watch how it was made.

VIVID MEMORIES (Making of) from Shotopop on Vimeo.

Shotopop creative agency recently teamed up with Ogilvy & Mather in Düsseldorf to create an Alzheimers awareness campaign. The campaign won a Silver Award at the 2012 European Design Awards in Helsinki! They also made this video to document the process of the laser cutting at CLC and the additional preparation required for the 9mm MDF brain panels. Have a look!

More on the project in the showcase section

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Boxmaker - generates a PDF you can use to cut a notched box on a laser cutter at any dimension!

Check out boxmaker, such a great little application that can save hours over drawing work to make slot together notched boxes. Wish we’d thought of this first.

Step 1

Input the dimensions that you would like your box to be. Make sure you are working in millimeters.

The cut width refers to the width of material removed by the laser. A value of zero is usually safe but very slightly loose-fitting. For snugger fits get in touch for some advice. It’s difficult to specify an exact width from material to material. but we can advise you on this. (also should be a blog post feature in the near future.)

Step 2

Copy and paste the box components into one of Machine bed templates.

Nest the components as economically as possible and define the strokes accordingly (Red hairline stroke.)

Then send you files over to us for a quote

by Jamie at May 09, 2019 12:29 PM

Fabbaloo

How to Build a Backyard Workshop for $2,000

A DIY backyard workshop — for 3D printing? [Source: SolidSmack]

A DIY backyard workshop — for 3D printing? [Source: SolidSmack]

...

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by SolidSmack.com at May 09, 2019 10:34 AM

3D Print.com

Interview with Patrizio Carlucci of Innovation Lab ECCO on 3D Printing Shoes

This is an in depth interview with Patrizio Carlucci the Head of Ecco Innovation Lab. The interview covers a variety of aspects within the footwear industry as a whole.

View the entire article via our website.

by Ese Osaghae at May 09, 2019 07:55 AM

Interview with Ken Burns of Forecast3D on Manufacturing as a Service

I was very impressed with Ken Burns’ presentation at Additive Manufacturing Strategies in Boston. Ken is the technical sales director of the 3D printing services and manufacturing company...

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by Joris Peels at May 09, 2019 07:32 AM

Fabbaloo

3D Print.com

HP: Announces Siemens Collaboration, Releases Jet Fusion 5200 Series, Plus New Software and Materials

“The Fourth Industrial Revolution is one of the most transformative forces in our lifetime. New technology innovations will be required, new partnership models will emerge, and new modes of doing...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 09, 2019 07:15 AM

3D Printing News Briefs: May 9, 2019

For today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’re starting with some business and software news, then moving on to examples of things you can make with 3D printing – even the production...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 09, 2019 05:38 AM

May 08, 2019

3D Print.com

US Researchers Study Ways to Eliminate Pore Formation in Laser Powder Bed Fusion 3D Printing

In ‘Dynamics of pore formation during laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing,’ US researchers continue to improve on 3D printing, exploring how to prevent pores from forming during laser...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 08, 2019 08:30 PM

Fabbaloo

3D Systems Takes Huge Stock Price Hit

3D Systems’ stock price dropped over 20%! [Source: Google]

3D Systems’ stock price dropped over 20%! [Source: Google]

3D Systems...

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by General Fabb at May 08, 2019 07:38 PM

3D Print.com

University of Pittsburgh: 3D Printing Mammary Glands to Study Premalignant Disease

Recently, Adrian V. Lee of University of Pittsburgh prepared a study for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command regarding 3D printed medical models and breast cancer research. His...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 08, 2019 05:55 PM

Swiss & Italian Researchers 3D Print Microdevices for Clean Water

Better processes are necessary for bringing clean water to the world, and researchers from both Switzerland and Italy detail the advantages of progressive cleaning devices in ‘Magnetically navigable...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 08, 2019 05:43 PM

Fabbaloo

What Is Industrial 3D Printing?

[Image: BMW Group]

[Image: BMW Group]

There isn't an industry on Earth that won't be touched, and...

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by Megan Nichols at May 08, 2019 05:18 PM

GKN Powder Metallurgy Opens North American HQ, AM Customer Center

[Image: GKN Powder Metallurgy]

[Image: GKN Powder Metallurgy]

Germany-based GKN Powder Metallurgy is expanding...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 08, 2019 03:51 PM

Ü3ëŠ{^¬Æ¢ž×§jwIÈ^vé^†(¸v¯xéÞ

3D printer maintenance tools [Source: Pixabay]

3D printer maintenance tools [Source: Pixabay]

Do you know how to maintain your...

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by General Fabb at May 08, 2019 01:04 PM

3D Print.com

Industry Experts Interview: Dr. Joseph DeSimone CEO of Carbon

Dr. Joseph DeSimone is Founder & CEO of Carbon. He was also Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and William R. Kenan, Jr....

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by Ese Osaghae at May 08, 2019 09:03 AM

Harnessing Light in China: Researchers 3D Print Microreactors For Photocatalysis

In ‘Fluorescent Fluid in 3D‐Printed Microreactors for the Acceleration of Photocatalytic Reactions,’ Chinese researchers from Dalian University of Technology are finding new ways to create...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 08, 2019 09:02 AM

Metal Printing with 3D Systems On Demand Services

Metal 3D printing has taken flight in the popular imagination over the past years, but what can businesses do with metal printing today? What kind of parts make sense in metal printing and how can...

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by Team 3D Systems at May 08, 2019 07:00 AM

May 07, 2019

Fabbaloo

The Strange Tale of B3 Innovations Ends In Dipping Sauce

B3 Innovation’s Pico Hybrid hot end is no more [Source: B3 Innovations]

B3 Innovation’s Pico Hybrid hot end is no more [Source: B3 Innovations]

...

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by General Fabb at May 07, 2019 08:18 PM

Jeremy Cook

SOLID Table Design Uses Glue and Hidden Screws

If you’ve ever wanted to build a very solid table/desk out of framing lumber, check out the build in the video below. It was built fairly small out of 2×3 lumber for my son, but could be expanded as needed to meet your needs. Notably, it includes wood screws obscured by custom blanks, but that’s mostly optional.

The post SOLID Table Design Uses Glue and Hidden Screws appeared first on JcoPro.net.

by Jeremy Cook at May 07, 2019 06:16 PM

3D Print.com

INTAMSYS Launches its Customer Applications Enabling Program

In order to better meet the market and the customer’s needs, INTAMSYS, a Shanghai-based leading industrial 3D printer manufacturer, is launching its Customer Applications Enabling Program....

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by Maxime Pages at May 07, 2019 05:31 PM

Learn 3D Printing from Design Thinking Pros Who Are Making an Impact

Discover how to design for 3D printing with a human-centered approach from speakers who have set out to use 3D printing to improve the world. In the first session of our online Beginner Design for 3D...

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by Caitlin McKinney at May 07, 2019 05:23 PM

SLS 3D Printing Problems and Solutions

JawsTec operates with several cutting edge types of industrial nylon 3D printers. Two HP MJF 4210, an EOS P 396, and two EOS P 400’s. In this article problems and solutions will be discussed based on...

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by Team JawsTec at May 07, 2019 05:15 PM

Fabbaloo

Met Gala Fashion 2019: 3D Printing, Camp, Collaboration

3D printed gowns and accessories at the 2019 Met Gala [Image: Getty Images]

3D printed gowns and accessories at the 2019 Met Gala [Image: Getty Images]

...

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by Sarah Goehrke at May 07, 2019 04:12 PM

3D Print.com

Penn State: 4D Printing with Wood Composites for Architectural Applications

In ‘Designing for Shape Change: A Case study on 3D Printing Composite Materials for Responsive Architectures,’ Elena Vazquez, Benay Gursoy, and Jose Duarte present details on customizing parts to...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 07, 2019 03:20 PM

3D Pod Episode 7 3D Scanning & Interview With Direct Dimensions CEO Michael Raphael

MIchael Raphael is one of the most experienced and knowledgeable 3D scanning people worldwide. For years he and his company Direct Dimensions have been asked to 3D scan important buildings,...

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by Joris Peels at May 07, 2019 03:09 PM

Fabbaloo

Fictiv's Survey On Production

Gabrielle Guthrie, Co-Founder, & Creative Director, Moxxly [Source: Fictiv]

Gabrielle Guthrie, Co-Founder, & Creative Director, Moxxly [Source: Fictiv]

...

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by General Fabb at May 07, 2019 03:09 PM

Sculpteo

Fabbaloo

New Desktop 3D Scanner From Artec 3D

The new Artec Micro high-resolution desktop 3D scanner [Source: Artec 3D]

The new Artec Micro high-resolution desktop 3D scanner [Source: Artec 3D]

...

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by General Fabb at May 07, 2019 01:01 PM

3D Print.com

Artec 3D Introduces Automated Desktop 3D Scanner Artec Micro

International 3D hardware and software manufacturer Artec 3D, which is headquartered in Luxembourg with subsidiaries in Russia and the US, just announced the launch of its new desktop 3D scanner, the...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 07, 2019 01:00 PM

Fabbaloo

Book of the Week: Discussing Design

Discussing Design [Source: Amazon]

Discussing Design [Source: Amazon]

This week’s selection is “Discussing...

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by General Fabb at May 07, 2019 10:17 AM

3D Print.com

3D Printing Industry Experts Interview With Ricky Solorzano Co-Founder and CEO of Allevi

This is a short interview with Ricky Solorzano from Allevi.

View the entire article via our website.

by Ese Osaghae at May 07, 2019 08:02 AM

3D Printed Rocket Company Relativity Signs Agreement with Satellite Rideshare Provider Spaceflight

Venture-backed Relativity has been busily disrupting the aerospace industry for the last four years with its 3D printed rockets. Based in Los Angeles, the autonomous rocket factory and launch...

View the entire article via our website.

by Sarah Saunders at May 07, 2019 06:08 AM

May 06, 2019

3D Print.com

Innofil3D Releases Two New Ultrafuse 3D Printing Filaments: Ultrafuse Z PCTG & Ultrafuse TPU 80A LF

Netherlands filament maker Innofil3D has just announced the launch of two new filaments: Ultrafuse Z PCTG – as the first electrostatic discharge (ESD) safe filament produced by BASF, this all-purpose...

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by Bridget O'Neal at May 06, 2019 11:00 PM

Ganit Goldstein Collaborated with Stratasys on New Fashion Collection of 3D Printed Jewelry and Shoes

Ganit Goldstein, a fashion design graduate from Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem, is one of many innovative fashion designers using 3D printing to create their designs. Recently, she...

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by Sarah Saunders at May 06, 2019 08:09 PM

Fabbaloo

Bio-Inspired Metal 3D Printing For Industry?

A 3D printed metal heat exchanger with highly advanced design [Source: GE]

A 3D printed metal heat exchanger with highly advanced design [Source: GE]

...

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by General Fabb at May 06, 2019 08:07 PM

3D Print.com

Organovo: Bioprinting Could be the New Solution to Organ Transplantation

Remember when movies like The Island seemed like a scary yet foreseeable future? In 2005, the sci-fi thriller introduced a compound inhabited by clones used for organ harvesting, as well as...

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by Vanesa Listek at May 06, 2019 06:48 PM