Future Manufacturing (Incoming News)

November 13, 2019

3D Print.com

Allevi Partners with Xylyx Bio to Create Liver Specific Bioniks

More than 500 vital functions have been identified with the liver, ranging from filtering blood to enzyme activation. For researchers, 3D bioprinting tissue structures with bioinks created...

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by Vanesa Listek at November 13, 2019 06:15 AM

Top 5 Software Packages for 3D Printing

3D printing is a tough job. Although once learned, it does not seem too tricky. However, for beginners, it might not seem as friendly as various other new technologies. The... The post Top 5...

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by Team PickPrinting at November 13, 2019 06:13 AM

Thermwood & Purdue: 3D Printed Composite Molds to Make Compression Molding Parts

If I had to name one company that’s an expert in terms of machining, I’d say Indiana-based Thermwood Corporation, the oldest CNC machine manufacturing company in business. The company...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 13, 2019 06:04 AM

BASF’s New Forward AM Corporate Brand & Expanding 3D Printing Materials Portfolio

In one week, formnext 2019 will begin in Frankfurt, and BASF 3D Printing Solutions (B3DPS), a subsidiary of BASF New Business GmbH, is joining many other companies at the top... The post...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 13, 2019 06:00 AM

3DGence to Present High-Performance New INDUSTRY 4F20 3D Printer at Formnext

Formnext does not begin until next week, running from November 19-22, but manufacturers and exhibitors are in full swing making announcements and preparing to arrive in Frankfurt, Germany as...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 13, 2019 05:59 AM

3D Print Mass Customized Grippers Thanks to trinckle

3D-printed tooling has now proven itself on the factory floor, but AM has yet to fully fulfill its transformative potential across manufacturing. Still, we are seeing bits and pieces of... The post...

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by Michael Molitch-Hou at November 13, 2019 05:10 AM

Etteplan & EOS Collaborate to Make 3D Printed Metal Objects with Embedded Electronics

Finland-based company Etteplan offers solutions for industrial equipment and plant engineering, as well as software and embedded solutions, to manufacturing companies around the world. In addition to...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 13, 2019 05:01 AM

November 12, 2019

Fabbaloo

PostProcess Technologies Scores Huge Investment, Plans Expansion

Operator using a PostProcess Technologies device [Source: PostProcess Technologies]

Operator using a PostProcess Technologies device [Source: PostProcess Technologies]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 12, 2019 08:55 PM

Objet

3D Printing Gets Classic Cars Out of the Garage and Onto the Road

It’s the Achilles’ heel of every car restoration, whether you are a casual enthusiast restoring a 70’s Mustang or a professional readying a Mercedes 300SL Gullwing to show at Concours: that hard-to-find part that you have been searching for—for years—with no success.

While using new, old-stock parts is the gold standard for restoration, that is often not possible when only 30 parts were ever made… in the 1920’s. Genuine second-hand parts may be of varying quality. A master craftsman may be able to produce a part that looks like the original, but this can be an expensive and time-consuming endeavor. 3D printing can be a compelling solution.

The idea of 3D printing spare parts for classic car restorations is not new – Porsche Classic made a splash several years ago when it announced it was using 3D printing to recreate parts for classic car collectors. However, advancing technology means it’s being done more effectively than ever before. As we announced this week, comedian Jay Leno is actively using Stratasys 3D printing to create a digital inventory for his own car collection, and now there are even 3D printing startups replacing traditional fabricators for creating aftermarket parts for the high-end car restoration market.

So, what’s changing? First, materials development has come a long way in the last decade, and there are options available that perform far beyond what ASA and ABS plastic can provide. If you need rigidity, look to carbon fiber-filled nylon. If you need heat and chemical tolerance, there’s Antero 800NA, which is a PEKK-based thermoplastic. Small manufacturers are using aluminum and steel to print carburetor parts. High-performance wishbones are even being printed in titanium.

Second, the tools to create CAD, 3D scanning tools, have advanced massively. Meticulously measuring every dimension will never produce an adequate CAD drawing of a hand-crafted part. But when you can 3D scan at 50,000 points per second at a resolution of 160,000 dots per inch, you can create 3D models of parts that capture every discernable detail. Along with an understanding of “Design for Additive Manufacturing,” engineers today not only create parts that are almost indistinguishable from the originals, but redesign them for higher performance.


Left: 1934 Rolls-Royce Merlin    Right: Carburetor Spacers & valve cover breather tubes
Courtesy: Big Dog Productions

Jay Leno, well-known as a lover of classic cars, owns 200 cars and 150 motorcycles valued at more than $50 million. He describes 3D printing as integral to his operation and a viable option for sourcing parts that are either extremely rare or simply no longer exist. He’s used 3D printing to create a timing belt cover for his 1960’s Pontiac Firebird. For his 1934 Rolls-Royce Merlin 12, his team created a set of valve cover breather tubes and carburetor spacers using 3D printing that would have been extremely difficult for all but the most masterful craftsmen to make. When he added a 7-liter Roush V8 engine to his 1966 Ford Galaxie 500, his engineering team used the design freedoms of 3D printing to create a new air intake plenum that provided a better fit and more air flow while not having to change the stock hood appearance.


Left: 1966 Ford Galaxie             Right: Air Intake Plenum
Courtesy: Big Dog Productions

Low volume manufacturing was identified by Stratasys’ consulting group, Blueprint, as one of the six business drivers of 3D printing. In particular, low-volume spare parts is a use case that is being discovered across industries. It’s exciting that the technology is finally in a place where it can deliver for car enthusiasts and provide a path to get that “unobtanium” part they have been searching for.

And as any car enthusiast will tell you, finding that last piece of the puzzle is invaluable; it’s where the satisfaction, pride, and, yes, money is. Whether that last part is the difference between an incomplete restoration and showing the car at Concours, or simply a father passing his first car onto the next generation, 3D printing provides an avenue to realize the dream of getting your classics out of the garage and onto the road.

Ready to learn more? See how the Blueprint team can help. Or take a look at the Stratasys range of offerings for high performance 3D printing.

The post 3D Printing Gets Classic Cars Out of the Garage and Onto the Road appeared first on Stratasys Blog.

by Aaron Hurd at November 12, 2019 07:30 PM

Fabbaloo

Formlabs Expands Dental Program In A Big Way

The new Form 3B dental 3D printer in a dental lab [Source: Formlabs]

The new Form 3B dental 3D printer in a dental lab [Source: Formlabs]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 12, 2019 05:45 PM

3D Print.com

Formlabs Acquires its Main Material Supplier Spectra

History is filled with examples of companies that acquire their supply chains, usually to increase synergies, reduce costs and promote innovation. One of the cases that best illustrates this...

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by Vanesa Listek at November 12, 2019 03:17 PM

Fabbaloo

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The Silver Belt 3D printer [Source: Robot Factory]

The Silver Belt 3D printer [Source: Robot Factory]

Robot Factory has developed...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 12, 2019 02:37 PM

3D Print.com

Formlabs New Dental Unit & The Formlabs 3B: Dentistry Done Different

There is no question about it, the demand for dental services will increase as the population ages and research continues to link oral health to overall health, and for many,... The post Formlabs...

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by Vanesa Listek at November 12, 2019 02:00 PM

PostProcess Completes $20M Series B Round; Plans Expansion in Europe

PostProcess Technologies, Inc., a provider of automated and intelligent post-printing solutions for 3D printed parts, has just announced a round of Series B funding led by the financial advisor,...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 12, 2019 12:45 PM

Adidas Kills the Speedfactory: Industrie 4.0 Funeral Date Not Yet Set

Adidas is killing off its Speedfactories. Yes, the 3D printing hypebeast itself, shoe manufacturer Adidas has decided to end its Speedfactories local manufacturing initiative. Just a few years ago the firm wanted to bring localized shoe manufacturing back to Europe by producing, in a highly automated way, close to the consumer. One of the major technologies that was to make this happen was 3D printing, more specifically Carbon. The Speedfactories were initially launched in 2017 with Adidas.

“To reduce manufacturing times and production periods, Adidas will use 3D printing or additive manufacturing methods as the core technology of its factory. By mid-2017, the German sportswear giant aims to produce roughly 500,000 pairs of shoes annually – nearly 1,370 pairs of shoes on a daily basis. In order for Adidas to match its global production level of 300 million pairs of shoes, the company will use high performance and enterprise-grade 3D printers.”

“the Adidas Speedfactory will replace thousands of human workers with robots, to automate some of the manual processes in the manufacturing phase. In comparison to its Asian factories, which house thousands of human workers, the Adidas Speedfactory will be run by around 160 employees.”

The Adidas Futurecraft sole

In April of 2017 the first athletic shoe to be printed at scale was announced. Eric Liedtke, Adidas Group Executive Board Member Responsible For Global Brands, had this to say,

“With Digital Light Synthesis, we venture beyond limitations of the past, unlocking a new era in design and manufacturing,” said Liedtke. “One driven by athlete data and agile manufacturing processes. By charting a new course for our industry, we can unleash our creativity- transforming not just what we make, but how we make it.”

If you play it backwards the shoe is drowning.

When the Futurecraft 4D was launched, Ben Herath, VP Design for Adidas Running, stated that,

“FUTURECRAFT 4D demonstrates the potential of Digital Light Synthesis in unlocking a new era in sport performance design. One driven by athlete data and incomparable precision to provide the best for the athletes, enabling them to make a difference in their run. This innovation changes how we design and free ourselves from limitations of the past. The possibilities of what we can now create with this technology to push the boundaries of performance is truly endless.”

It seems that this era is now at an end. Or is it? I’ve always been skeptical of Adidas’ hype creation in athletic shoes, and I got a lot of flak for pointing out that a cost estimate on the Carbon sole would be $43 per midsole. I was also skeptical about the longevity of the soles.

“This is a part that is put under continual mechanical stress. It is not a unidirectional stress as in a lab test however but under complex multidirectional stresses. If the 3D printed shoe sole part is under repeated strain will the residual stress of the previous step cause the sole to eventually shear? “

and

“I’m at present skeptical that the resin material would perform for long periods as a functional shoe sole.”

Now Adidas, according to Reuters, seems skeptical too.

” Adidas plans to close high-tech “robot” factories in Germany and the United States it launched to bring production closer to customers, saying on Monday deploying some of the technology in Asia would be “more economic and flexible”.

Martin Shankland, Adidas head of global operations, said the factories had helped the company improve its expertise in innovative manufacturing, but applying what it had learnt with its suppliers would be “more flexible and economic”.

A few things could be going on here:

1. 3D Printing is not suited for prime time. 3D printing is just not ready to produce an athletic shoe, individualized shoes are dead and there are no performance benefits to be had.

Pro: 3D printing can not produce the entire shoe. Athletic shoes have dozens of materials and dozens of production steps, we can not yet mimic these materials fully. Our materials and processes are generally too expensive and not automated enough. Typically if the redesign does not add sufficient value, the part will be more expensive than conventional manufacturing and not make sense.

Con: Adidas has focused on the midsole and was looking to other manufacturing technologies to automate the entire shoe production meaning the onus is not entirely on us. Nothing in Adidas’ disclosures or media statements ever gave any credence to the company solving the core manufacturing challenges of assembling a shoe out of dozens of disparate parts that are then automatically joined by some magic.

2. Carbon is not a viable manufacturing technology. Since Adidas partnered with and invested in Carbon, which got $682 million in funding, this is essentially a public admission by Adidas that Carbon is not a suitable manufacturing technology.

Pro: The sensibility of using a nonrecyclable thermoset material for an athletic shoe was long in doubt as was the high cost of Carbon as technology. Perhaps the real-world performance of the Futurecraft or other shoes was lacking, or the cost picture just didn’t add up?

Con: Many in the industry are skeptical of Carbon but this may be just a hiccup and an internal Adidas thing and have nothing at all to do with Carbon as a technology. Or indeed it could be a decision taken for a whole host of other reasons.

3. Industrie 4.0 is despite all the hype and subsidy dead. The Germans are, through one of their most internationally known and largest firms, publicly now stating that Industrie 4.0 was a subsidy trough and after eating their fill Adidas is indicating that manufacturing will in fact not return to Europe.

Pro: This is an embarrassing thing publicly for a large German firm to disclose. After years of Made in Germany, Industrie 4.0 press release nonsense, this is the nail in the coffin. Why else would Adidas do this if Industrie 4.0 wasn’t dead?

Con: Maybe Adidas doesn’t have the technological expertise to do this and does not believe enough in manufacturing in Europe? If this were true than other companies with more manufacturing and technical prowess could make European manufacturing viable again.

4. 3D Printing and Carbon may still be viable but for the foreseeable future manufacturing in Asia is here to stay. This would be quite the shocker to the automated production, lights out factory Industrie 4.0 Seminar crowd.

Pro: We know that support removal is a third of part costs in 3D printing in plastics. I estimated “7 minutes per sole to do all of this, that would add $12.60” for support removal, cleaning, and washing per sole. Maybe the robots are just not there yet and we can’t do this adequately and it could make sense to not do the Speedfactory thing. Maybe the Industrie 4.0 thing is bull and Asia will always be cheaper? This would have profound implications for the European Union not to mention put a few question marks round much of the Union’s subsidies in local manufacturing research.

Con: Why not keep selling high-cost high margin shoes in limited quantities for the marketing value and to be “first in the water.” Adidas could continue making 100,000 pairs a year or so until the economics were better.

5. Eric Liedke Will Leave. Last month Adidas and Carbon Board Member Eric Liedke stated that he is leaving Adidas at the end of the year. Eric was put on the Carbon board and is seen as the person who created the Carbon Adidas relationship. Perhaps his leaving the firm meant that a new faction at Adidas took over and wanted to move away from Eric’s direction. Or perhaps the too-cozy relationship with Carbon or the Speedfactory project itself was a reason for him to get kicked out.

Pro: This would be by far the simplest explanation, Icarus flew too close to the sun and his digital wings light synthesized making him fall earthward.

Con: It is still embarrassing for Adidas especially since none of their press on this move puts a positive spin on it at all or replaces it with an alternative. The firm could have simply put an “Addidas Speedfactory set up in Vietnam” approach on this instead. In and of itself it doesn’t explain much and they could have continued this if it were viable.

UPDATE: Adidas reached out to us and said that,

“Closure of the Speedfactories is limited to shoes with Boost midsoles. adidas 4D (Carbon) production remains unaffected.  In fact we will concentrate our resources and capacities even more on using 4D technology in footwear production and we’re actively scaling our volumes over the next couple of years. Adidas is invested, committed and believes in the Carbon Digital Manufacturing Platform and technology. And Eric’s departure from adidas is not connected to adidas’ partnership with Carbon. The partnership is as strong as ever.”

The post Adidas Kills the Speedfactory: Industrie 4.0 Funeral Date Not Yet Set appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Joris Peels at November 12, 2019 12:34 PM

Fabbaloo

Book of the Week: DIY Drones for the Evil Genius

DIY Drones for the Evil Genius [Source: Amazon]

DIY Drones for the Evil Genius [Source: Amazon]

This week’s selection is...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 12, 2019 11:33 AM

3D Print.com

Meltio’s 3E Metal Deposition Technology: Easy, Efficient and Expandable

Meltio has entered the 3D printing market to meet the needs of industries that have been waiting years for a reliable, accessible, and hassle-free solution to implement direct metal 3D printing into the production process.

Thanks to an exclusive development, Meltio’s unique patented technology brings many advantages compared to existing technologies in the industry. It’s what the company has called 3E Metal Deposition Technology: Easy, Efficient and Expandable.

Meltio defines its technology as easy because it avoids the inconveniences of existing metal 3D printers. The outer dimensions of the hardware are significantly compact (550x600x1400 mm), without the typical hassle of common and bulky industrial hardware, which usually needs special facilities and infrastructure. The multi-laser printhead, which is in fact the core of this technology, is able to manufacture with metal wire, which makes the operation clean and safe and with 100% material utilization.

Apart from this, the printers are able to fabricate parts with metallic wire, powder, or by combining both materials in the same part and without changing the nozzle, which is an industry first. The result is 100% dense metal parts made of any material commonly used in welding: titanium, steel, copper, aluminum, Inconel, etc.

The new development will also allow many companies to integrate metal 3D printing in their workflows, by lowering traditional access barriers in terms of pricing. The acquisition cost of hardware is about 50% to 75% lower than current market prices and material cost is up to 10 times lower, which is a significant step towards massive adoption of direct metal 3D printing.

Moreover, the possibilities of Meltio’s 3D printing are easily expandable thanks to the integration of 3D printing modules (Meltio Engine) with CNC, robotic, or gantry systems. This way manufacturing possibilities range from small parts to parts of several meters in size, turning traditional systems into hybrid ones with metal deposition capabilities. This makes the technology easily adaptable to multiple applications across various industries including aerospace, automotive, and large scale manufacturing.

How it works

3E Metal Deposition technology works with a multi-laser printhead with a high-power capacity (0.6 to 6 kw). The highly compact deposition head (150mm width/depth x 265mm height) features three independent diode lasers (although more lasers can be added as an upgrade for more power). The printing takes place within an argon chamber that only requires a small amount of gas or in an open atmosphere with just nozzle argon shield gas coverage. Furthermore, changing materials is automatic and accomplished in seconds without the risk of contamination, unlike powder bed fusion technology where it is necessary to perform time-consuming decontamination between material changes.

The system features active process control, which automatically sets the nozzle to part distance for each layer and also manages process parameters throughout the print based on sensor feedback.

Meltio’s unique laser technology allows the production of metallic alloys which are usually difficult to weld. In addition, more applications can be used besides 3D printing: repairing of existing parts through additive manufacturing, cladding, welding (autogenous and with filler), curing, texturing and polishing.

This technology has a significant endorsement through ArcelorMittal, the world leading steel manufacturing company, which has participated in the company since its formation.

Meltio is a new joint venture with the participation of Additec, an American company based in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Sicnova, a Spanish company with a vast history in the 3D field.  its inception has been an international company with a clear global vision and offices in United States and Spain. The main headquarters and factory are located in Linares, Jaen (Spain), with R&D centers in both, the US and Europe.

Meltio’s new metal 3D printer, the Meltio M450, and the Engine deposition modules for hybrid manufacturing and robotic applications, will be showcased at Formnext November 19th-22nd (Hall 12.1, booth C111). The stand will also feature other additive manufacturing and 3D digitalization solutions from Meltio’s portfolio.

The post Meltio’s 3E Metal Deposition Technology: Easy, Efficient and Expandable appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Team Meltio at November 12, 2019 08:13 AM

TU Delft: A New Approach for the 3D Printed Hand Prosthetic

In the recently published ‘Functional evaluation of a non-assembly 3D-printed hand prosthesis,’ authors (from TU Delft) Juan Sebastian Cuellar, Gerwin Smit, Paul Breedveld, Amir Abbas Zadpoor, and Dick Plettenburg outline their recent development efforts in 3D printed hand prosthetics—along with their plans for extending their use to developing countries.

As the authors investigated statistics on amputees, they discovered that most frequently, individuals tend to lose limbs due to issues like trauma, disease, infection, and more. What is most surprising, however, is that while tens of millions of people have lost limbs—only 5-15 percent have access to prosthetics. In developing countries, healthcare is spotty, and while it may be available to some in larger cities, transportation from rural areas is obviously challenging. Treatment options are scarce, as are follow-ups for amputees.

With the advent of 3D printing, however, and especially the progress being made with medical devices like prosthetics and orthotics, the researchers see great potential for developing countries. Recognizing the number of groups and non-profits already responsible for distributing a variety of 3D printed prosthetics, the authors have taken note of the many benefits that make such technology suitable for developing countries—beginning with affordability and speed in production. Customization is also key, however; for example, in more conventional medical settings, kids may grow out of their prosthetics before they are even delivered. 3D printing allows for patient-specific treatment and much easier adjustments.

Here, the researchers created a new approach for providing 3D printed hands to amputees in developing countries—re-working both design and fabrication, as well as mechanics and function. They based their new design on the following requirements:

  • Body-powered (BP) control
  • Cosmetic appearance
  • Light weight
  • Water/dirt resistant
Design of our 3D-printed prosthetic hand. The palm in the left picture is translucent to show the inner mechanisms (from top to bottom: leaf springs, whippletree mechanisms, and driving link), and the right picture shows the 3D-printed prosthetic hand without the palm.

Design of the 3D-printed prosthetic hand. The palm in the left picture is translucent to show the inner mechanisms (from top to bottom: leaf springs, whippletree mechanisms, and driving link), and the right picture shows the 3D-printed prosthetic hand without the palm.

The design consists of four fingers and a stationary thumb, with the fingers—moving in a rotated motion with one degree of freedom—connected to the palm via a hinged joint. The fingers are connected via a ‘whippletree arrangement,’ then move through a force transmission scheme that also includes the main driving link and links to each finger.

“The hand is actuated by a Bowden cable attached to the main driving link that can go on a linear motion following the movement of the cable. Return forces that permit hand opening are generated by leaf springs connected on one end to the base of the fingers and on the other end to the whippletree mechanism,” explain the authors.

“The leaf spring configuration is designed as a series of curved thin 3D-printed plastic sheets that allow elastic bending and work as pulling elements at the same time. When the fingers are activated, the pulling forces drive the leaf springs to unbend and deform to a straight configuration. As the leaf springs return and recover from the deformation, spring-like behavior is provided, combining actuation and a return spring in one non-assembly 3D-printed element.”

The experimental setup for the leaf spring ultimate strength test. The leaf spring is in its neutral configuration (left). The 3D-printed sample is under tensile and bending loading conditions during experiment. Note that the leaf spring is bent to a straight configuration, corresponding with a 90 flexion of the finger (right).

The researchers depended on an Ultimaker 3 printer, using PLA, for production of the hand, with the entire mechanism printed at once to avoid complex post-assembly.

“The hand was 3Dprinted with the circular cross-section area of the hinges of the fingers parallel to building plate of the 3D printer. In this way, the layers that form the leaf springs, the whippletree mechanism, and the driving link are deposited along the perpendicular direction of their moving direction during the hand prosthesis activation,” explained the researchers.

Although the 3D printed hand is only composed of two parts, it is still successful in adaptive grasping. Overall, the researchers found the design to be very promising, especially due to the equipment needed for production, which was not only affordable but accessible. They did find the leaf spring in need of further refinement, due to its lack of ability to withstand much cyclic loading. Other materials could solve this problem, however.

Along with the level of functionality found here, the researchers point out that rarely—if ever—are 3D printed hand prosthetics produced with accompanying evaluation. In this study, they were able to make a difference by offering metrics and data to be used as a base for further developments.

“Direct comparison with other existing 3D-printed hands was not possible given the lack of data in the literature. The results presented in this study can be used as a starting point for future developments on 3D-printed prosthetic hands,” concluded the researchers.

“The non-assembly design achieved a comparable level of functionality with respect to other BP alternatives. Taking into consideration that most ADLs require low gripping forces and adding an increased accessibility provided by the advantages of the nonassembly and 3D printing approach, we consider this prosthetic hand a valuable option for people with arm defects in developing countries.”

The experimental setup to measure the activation and pinch forces (left). The index and middle fingers push the load cell against the thumb. The ring and little fingers meet the maximum closing angle (90) (right)

3D printing of prosthetics continues to evolve around the world, and with users on many different levels; for instance, many students are involved too in creating devices for limb replacement, from forming their own charities to providing aid to amputees in Haiti. Organizations like e-NABLE are also famous for their efforts, helping those in need from Florida to Nigeria. Find out more about the efforts from TU Delft here.

What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

Our 3D-printed prosthetic hand attached to the simulator and a figure-of-nine shoulder harness. The cable tension that is delivered by the harness and activates the prosthetic hand is depicted (left).

Our 3D-printed prosthetic hand attached to the simulator and used by the participating subjects (left) for the Box andBlocks test (top right) and the SHAP test (bottom right). Gaffer tape strips were put over the thumb, the index, and middle fingers to increase grip (right).

[Source / Images: ‘Functional evaluation of a non-assembly 3D-printed hand prosthesis’]

The post TU Delft: A New Approach for the 3D Printed Hand Prosthetic appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 12, 2019 08:10 AM

3D Printing News Briefs: November 12, 209

In today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, we’re talking a little business, then moving on to some medical news. Volkswagen has achieved a major metal 3D printing milestone with HP, and BASF has certified a 3D printed autoclave as pressure equipment for the first time. BRECA Health Care has renewed its 3D printed medical device license in Europe, and 3D Systems’ NextDentR Denture 3D+ has received FDA clearance.

Volkswagen Reaches Milestone with HP Metal Jet Printing

In 2018, Volkswagen chose to adopt HP’s Metal Jet 3D printing technology to help achieve its three-phase strategic roadmap to functional AM production. Soon, it will reach a production run of over 10,000 high-quality metal parts 3D printed by HP and GKN Powder Metallurgy, just in time to support the launch event of its ID.3 electric vehicle – the first fully electric production car with a CO2-neutral footprint. Over the next two phases of its plan, Volkswagen will quickly integrate Metal Jet 3D printed structural parts into its next generation of vehicles, with a goal of continually increasing the part size and technical requirements. The company is partnering with GKN to 3D print functional metal parts for auto and industrial leaders on HP’s Metal Jet factories, as well as thousands of ID.3 models for the marketing campaign.

“Our vision to industrialize additive manufacturing is quickly becoming a reality with HP Metal Jet, it is a game changer for the automotive industry. The pace of innovation by HP and advanced capabiltiies of the technology have exceeded our expectations. We are meeting our milestones and are actively identifying and developing functional parts for production,” said Dr. Martin Goede, Volkswagen’s Head of Technology Planning and Development.

“What better way to showcase the innovation of Volkswagen than to use our own technologies in the marketing campaign for the premiere ID.3 launch. We are extremely pleased with the technical features and the speed, quality and low-cost per part that HP Metal Jet has provided.  The surface quality and feature resolution enabled great attention to detail and made it possible to add a special touch to this important company milestone.”

HP will be showcasing its Metal Jet technology at this week’s FABTECH event in Chicago (Booth A3-638), as well as next week’s formnext in Frankfurt (Booth D21, Hall 12.1).

BASF Manufactures and Certifies First 3D Printed Pressure Equipment

Chemical company BASF uses 3D printing to optimize components, which in turn improves chemical processes. Recently, the Technical Inspection at BASF SE, in its role as Notified Body (user inspectorate), certified the first 3D printed autoclave as a pressure equipment. BASF used SLM technology to manufacture the austenitic stainless steel component, which conforms to the European Pressure Equipment Directive (2014/68/EU), meets Category III requirements, and allows for faster temperature cycles. This is pretty important, as an autoclave is a container inside which a reaction between chemical components is triggered by pressure and temperature. BASF is now the first company to execute a certification process which includes a procedure qualification for 3D printed pressure equipment.

“We use additive manufacturing technology when it offers added value compared to conventional manufacturing methods,” said Dr. Alba Mena Subiranas, Maintenance & Reliability Solutions. “Pressure equipment poses a special challenge, particularly in design, manufacturing and certification.”

BRECA Health Care Renews License for 3D Printing Medical Devices

Granada-based BRECA Health Care is continuing toward its goal of widespread 3D printing adoption in hospitals. Founded in 2011, the company has been something of a pioneer in terms of the technology’s use in clinical cases, and is working to become a leader at managing its use in hospitals, having performed hundreds of cases in countries ranging from Belgium and Saudi Arabia to Mexico and its native Spain. Now, BRECA announced that it’s had its license renewed to continue 3D printing custom medical devices in Europe until 2025. With this in mind, the company has also launched a service to help create an internal 3D printing laboratory in hospitals.

“We are very happy to be able to continue doing this type of reconstructions,” said José Manuel Baena, PhD in Biomedicine and Industrial Engineer and founder of BRECA Health Care and REGEMAT 3D. “The first license was given to us in 2014 and needs to be renewed every 5 years. In 2014 it was quite complicated since there was practically no information and the autonomous communities did not have a very established process, since they were based on the licenses that are given to orthopaedics to customize technical aids and the implantable products are very different. Now the process is much more defined and even hospitals are trying to get this license to make some products in house.”

NextDentR Denture 3D+ Receives FDA clearance

3D Systems announced that its biocompatible NextDent Denture 3D+ material has officially received 510(k) clearance from the FDA. The material – the latest in the company’s portfolio of NextDent dental resins – has great mechanical properties, and helps dental labs and clinics produce dentures at a 90% lower cost and 75% faster. By combining the material with the company’s NextDent 5100 dental 3D printer and intra-oral scanning and dental software solutions, you’ve got a great end-to-end digital dentistry solution that ensures efficiency, cost savings, and properly fitted devices.

“With 3D Systems’ Digital Denture Workflow, dental laboratories and clinics are now able to produce dental devices at dramatically increased speed while reducing material waste and capital equipment expenditure as well as reliance upon milling centers. FDA clearance of NextDent Denture 3D+ is the last piece that creates a trusted end-to-end workflow – giving prosthodontists a competitive advantage while improving the patient experience,” said Rik Jacobs, Vice President and General Manager, Dental, 3D Systems.

Discuss these stories and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts in the Facebook comments below.

The post 3D Printing News Briefs: November 12, 209 appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Sarah Saunders at November 12, 2019 08:10 AM

Germany: 3D Printed β-TCP Scaffolds for Bone Replacement

In ‘Inversely 3D-Printed β-TCP Scaffolds for Bone Replacement,’ German researchers predefined pore structures in scaffolding to explore different cell growth behaviors. Using FDM 3D printing and PLA, the team of scientists created molds to direct bone growth.

Although 3D printing is lending new technology and techniques for bone regeneration, the researchers remind us that there are still many challenges, and mainly because bone tissue engineering is a difficult area of science regardless of method or material. Most importantly, biomechanical systems are complex and must encompass biocompatibility, suitable mechanical properties, and pore size.

While historically scaffolds have been 3D printed, here the researchers endeavor to define the pore structure within a 3D construct. They printed the scaffolds with PLA, using calcium phosphate (CaP) as biomaterial due to its biocompatibility, after which the β-TCP scaffolds with preset pore structure were characterized.

“To obtain the final bioceramic scaffolds, a water-based slurry was filled into the PLA molds. The slurry contained 70 wt% of β-TCP and 1 wt% based on solid content DOLAPIX CE64 (Zschimmer & Schwarz, Lahnstein, Germany) as a dispersant. The grain sizes of the β-TCP powder ranged from 0.6 to 40 µm (d10 = 2.0 ± 0.04 µm; d50 = 5.27 ± 0.08 µm, and d90 = 14.84 ± 0.09 µm),” explained the researchers.

“Samples with strand widths of 500, 750, and 1000 µm were produced with the 3D printer, filled with ceramic slurry, and sintered according to the above protocol. In the following, the designations 500, 750, and 1000 µm remained, which herein refer to the empty spaces between the β-TCP strands for the differentiation of the samples.”

β-TCP scaffold samples were weighed and measured, with surface roughness averaged from all values.

β-TCP scaffold (500 µm) through a stereomicroscope (Olympus SZ61). A: Top view; and B: Side view. Scale bar = 3mm; magnification: 0.67×.

Measurement results of surface roughness with n = 15 and a 400x magnification.

“The scaffolds with a strand width of 1000 µm showed the highest roughness on the surface of 9.61 ± 2.02 µm. The 750 µm scaffolds has the lowest surface roughness of 7.97 µm ± 1.54 µm. With p > 0.05 the surface roughness values showed no significant differences,” explained the researchers.

Overall, the team was able to prove that different strand distances do influence scaffolds, with the 500 µm scaffolds showing the greatest compressive strength and exhibiting the best potential for being used in bone replacement.

“The biocompatibility of β-TCP was also successfully tested. The cells showed a high proliferation rate on the scaffolds, and no cytotoxicity was measured from the material. In addition, the degradation of the material, which is important for bone replacement, could be demonstrated with the help of simulated body fluid,” concluded the researchers.

“β-TCP showed an incipient degradation of the material after a 28-day incubation in an SBF solution, which could be detected by the formation of HA crystals on the samples. In conclusion, it can be said that β-TCP is biocompatible and thus a suitable material, and the inverse FDM printing process with subsequent slip casting is a suitable method for use in bone replacement.”

Although researchers soldier on within the bioprinting realm—amidst all the challenges found there—bone regeneration continues to be fraught with obstacles; however, scientists continue to create a variety of scaffolds, experiment with materials like hydroxyapatite, as well as coatings. What do you think of this news? Let us know your thoughts! Join the discussion of this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com.

Macro and microstructure of the scaffolds; stereomicroscopic images of all three sizes: (a): 500 µm empty space; (b): 750 µm; and (c): 1000 µm. microstructures taken with FEI QUANTA 250 FEG, 20 kV, 3200x magnification of the surface from sample: (d): 500 µm; (e): 750 µm; and (f): 1000 µm.

[Source / Images: ‘Inversely 3D-Printed β-TCP Scaffolds for Bone Replacement’]

 

The post Germany: 3D Printed β-TCP Scaffolds for Bone Replacement appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 12, 2019 07:43 AM

Advancements in Water-Soluble Materials for 3D Printing Support Filament

A new material has been developed that is ideal for use as a general-purpose water-soluble support for additive manufacturing (3D printing). Its thermal stability and robust adhesion characteristics make it an ideal support system for a wide array of build materials.

Most manufacturers understand how 3D printing enables them to produce stronger, lighter parts and systems. Although many different materials can be used to create 3D-printed models, thermoplastics like acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polylactic acid (PLA) and polycarbonate (PC) are the most commonly used.

Complex thermoplastic parts and structures have bridges or overhangs that require support during printing. Since these support structures are not part of the model, they need to be removed after printing. This post-processing step is important, because it affects the printed part’s final surface finish, strength and color. However, it can be tedious, require the use of harmful chemicals, damage the model’s surface and reduce productivity. That’s why it’s critical to select the right material for 3D printing support structures.

BREAKAWAY VS. SOLUBLE SUPPORT STRUCTURES

Two basic categories of materials are available for support structures: breakaway and soluble. Breakaway support structures are often constructed from a material that is similar to the printed object. After printing, the support is removed by trimming, mechanical breakage, or abrasion.

All of these steps add work, and therefore time and cost, to each piece. In addition, removing the 3D printing support structures can leave blemishes on the model surface or break off part of the model along with the structure. Also, removing breakaway supports is generally more difficult when working with high-temperature materials.

Alternatively, soluble support materials can be removed by placing them in water or a solvent after printing. Using solvents is undesirable because they are generally volatile organic compounds that are unfriendly to printers and the environment. But water-soluble support materials can also be tricky to work with. For example, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) absorbs water vapor from the air, doesn’t stick very well to print surfaces, and is temperature sensitive, which can cause jams. Also, water-soluble support materials have been exceptionally challenging to develop.

DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES OF SOLUBLE SUPPORTS

Developing water-soluble supports is challenging for many reasons. First, there are a limited number of commercially available resins that are truly water-soluble. Many water-soluble polymers are very brittle, which prevents their conversion to filament. In addition, plasticizing using traditional additives often inhibits thermal stability and adhesion, which severely limits their use in 3D printing.

The first generation of soluble supports had a variety of issues. Some used harmful chemicals or highly acidic or highly basic solutions. Although some of these are still widely used, resin technology has advanced, and there are now a plethora of soluble support materials on the commercial market including:

• Highly proprietary resins (Stratasys SR30, SR35, SR100, etc.)

• Resins based on commonly available PVA or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)

• Cellulosics like hydropropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)

• Exotic polybutenediol vinyl alcohol (BVOH)

Yet none of these products is ideal for filament because they are not thermally stable. Now there is a better material option.

WATER-SOLUBLE RESINS THAT ARE TOUGH ENOUGH FOR FILAMENT

Infinite Material Solutions recently developed a composite material that is both water-soluble and thermally stable. This “outside the box” resin is formulated from a naturally occurring carbohydrate blended with a polymer that is flexible, tough and water-soluble. The new material (branded AquaSys™ 120) is unique because it is tough enough to be used as support filament.

This formulation is surprising because many pure carbohydrates and water-soluble polymers are far too brittle to form a usable filament. Over the years, formulators have made many attempts to plasticize water-soluble resins so they could be converted to filament. However, adding plasticizers often dramatically reduces the thermal stability of the base resin. Also, plasticizers can inhibit the adhesion between materials, severely limiting their use for 3D printing. AquaSys 120 uses a highly complex process to produce 1.75 mm and 2.85 mm diameter filament that can be used successfully for a variety of 3D printing platforms and materials.

MATERIAL BENEFITS AND COMPATIBILITY

The individual components of this new material are widely used in industry for a variety of applications ranging from packaging and drug delivery to cosmetics and personal care products. The material is hydrophilic, biocompatible, biodegradable, nontoxic, and noncarcinogenic, based on information available for all the individual components.

This new filament material can be used for the most common 3D printing technologies including fused filament fabrication and direct material extrusion. It is also compatible with a broad range of materials including polypropylene and hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymers. It shows excellent thermal stability and other advantages over traditional PVA that make it a more versatile, robust, and environmentally friendly material for support filaments.

These advantages include:

• Dissolves in water much faster than pure PVA

• Can be printed with a wider range of materials

• Has enhanced adhesion properties

• Is more quickly biodegraded than PVA

THERMAL STABILITY AT MUCH HIGHER TEMPERATURES

A leading brand of PVA filament prints at 215-225 ºC and a maximum build plate temperature of 60 ºC. Alternatively, AquaSys 120 filament prints at 240-245 ºC and a maximum build plate temperature of 130 ºC.

ADHESION CHARACTERISTICS

Being able to build materials that can adhere to soluble supports, or vice versa, is of critical importance to achieving a successful 3D print. Poor adhesion between adjacent layers of support and build materials causes sloughing off and print failures.

The new material was engineered with enhanced adhesion properties to address this problem. It is compatible with a wide range of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials used in filament-driven 3D printing platforms and continues to be used with new build materials.

To date it, AquaSys 120 has been successfully printed with polyamides (nylon), co-polyester (CPE), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), polycarbonate (PC), and polyolefins like polypropylene (PP). This offers a significant advantage over traditional PVA filament, which has limited adhesion to CPE, ABS, TPU, PC, and PP.

DISSOLUTION

In head-to-head dissolution trials of identically printed parts, the new filament material dissolved twice as fast as a leading brand of PVA at room temperature (22 ºC) and over six times faster at elevated temperatures (80 ºC). Figure 1 shows its dissolution kinetics versus PVA. Unlike PVA, which can form gels prior to dissolution and especially at elevated temperatures, the new material dissolves cleanly with no gelation at temperatures >35 ºC.

DISPOSAL AND BIODEGRADABILITY

The new composite material is based on a naturally occurring carbohydrate that is very rapidly mineralized in the environment. Mineralization of this carbohydrate component can take several hours or days. The remaining components of the material biodegrade more slowly, but like PVA, they are considered to be ultimately biodegradable based on respirometric mineralization tests using acclimated sludge from wastewater treatment facilities.

A new water-soluble support material is now available that solves a number of challenging issues in additive manufacturing. This carbohydrate composite capitalizes on the unusual thermal stability and outstanding water solubility of a naturally occurring saccharide blended with a flexible and tough water-soluble polymer. This unique material provides advanced adhesion to a wide variety of build materials, a broad processing window and improved aqueous dissolution performance without the use of solvents or harsh chemicals.

By: Nathan W. Ockwig, Gavriel DePrenger-Gottfried, Brandon Cernohous, Philip J. Brunner, Jeffrey J. Cernohous

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by Team Infinite Materials at November 12, 2019 07:43 AM

Honest 3D Printer Review: Over 100 Hours of Printing with the Anet ET4

The Chinese 3D printers manufacturer Anet has made a name for itself in the world of 3D printing over the past few years with the Anet A8. Its low price and competitive printing quality made it very attractive for many people and it became very popular in a short time. But sometimes cheap can be expensive in the long run, and the dream of the Anet A8 became a bit of a nightmare when some users reported that their 3D printers started catching fire. But that is in the past and this year a new and improved A8 plus is on the market and seems that they have invested in security features. I also think that it is time to give another chance to Anet now that a new promising printer is on the market, the Anet ET4. As they say it is “Designed with safety in mind. The embedded thermistor and heater on the extruder are specially fixed.” 

What do I want from a 3D printer? I am a designer, what is important for me primarily is the print quality, consistency and that the printer is easy to use. I don’t want to know much about how 3D printers work, software hacks and workarounds. I want a reliable machine, that has good print quality and doesn’t give me too much trouble.

The Anet ET4 and its specifications. Picture courtesy of Anet.

The ET4 is a DIY desktop 3D printer, once you get it home you have to assemble it. Because of its modular design, it doesn’t take a lot of work to start printing. When you open the box for the first time the assembly is mostly intuitive. It doesn’t have many parts, most of them are built into 3 separate blocks that you can assemble together with a few screws. I just had to check the instructions a couple of times. Unboxing, set up and getting to your first print is very simple overall. 

I like the fact that this printer is built on a full-metal frame. It is an aluminum frame that makes it easy to move around since it is not too heavy. It gives a sense of durability and has a compact design that makes the printer quite steady and resistant to vibrations. Although as we have mentioned before the Anet A8 made us feel a bit uneasy when we left a printer home alone working, the ET4 seems quite solid. 

Detail of the extruder engine

Detail of the printer nozzle

Once you turn it on you can control some of the printing features through a 2.8 inch touchscreen that is placed in the base of the printer. I do not like to have my computer connected to the printer all the times so for me the use of the screen on the printer is a must, it makes the work much easier to control. It also lets me check what the settings of the printer such as nozzle and print bed temperature, files to be printed and how long it will take etc. The controls and software were easy enough to use and clear. The UI on the machine was clear enough as well. 

One other feature that I find quite handy is the “Resume Printing”: in case the printing is interrupted suddenly the resume printing feature lets you continue the print from where it stops. It comes in quite handy in case of a power outage or some similar issue. But it is not as simple as it sounds, it is true that you can continue the print job but when the machine goes off, the filament, still warm, keeps coming out of the nozzle onto the piece. So this must be scraped away. 3D printing is still a mix of the future and an artisanal craft. In this case, I had to use a very sharp knife to take off that little knot of plastic. Filament end detection on the printer works as advertised. 

One of the features that didn’t satisfy me is the auto-leveling. It is quite common in FDM 3D printers nowadays but the ET4 didn’t quite nail down this feature. It has 25 checking points along the print bed, which makes it seem quite promising. For the first print, I did manual leveling, and from then on, I tried to use only the auto-leveling but it didn’t always work properly. In the end, what worked for me was to do manual leveling and then on top of that some auto-leveling. The manual leveling itself is easy to do and works reliably. The retraction settings in the software were reversed but I told the company and this should be fixed soon. I was surprised that no one caught this issue earlier. Loading and unloading new filament, feeding it all went off without a hitch.

Another important aspect for me is the noise level that the printer makes. The Anet ET4 is quite silent, it doesn’t bother me at all to have it in the background printing while I am doing some other work, and I am quite picky about noise. The ET4 has the option of choosing between two stepper drivers, the A4988 and the TMC2208, I got the second one which makes the printer almost silent. You can get the latest updated driver is through their official website. I would definitely recommend spending $15 more for the TMC2208 version of the ET4 if you buy this printer. The quieter drivers make the printer much easier to live with. 

Good quality of printing and texture detail: 3D printed sample made with the Anet ET4.

And now my favorite part, the print quality. It is the most important aspect for me and I was positively surprised by the results. I use 3D printing to make molds for ceramics but also to 3D print final pieces so I need the results to look professional. With the right print settings, you can get neat results. The printing resolution really delivers, especially for a printer at this price point. I was also very happy with the printing of textures, I have had troubles before with other printers. Sometimes textures can look a bit clumsy or the machine starts making strange noises when making short and fast movements to print small textures. This wasn’t the case here. I was able to, quietly, obtain very high detailed textures for both small and larger parts using this machine. Yes, the printer isn’t perfect but its a good machine for the price.

After over 100 hours printing with the ET4, I am confident in saying that if you are thinking to buy a printer and your budget goes from $200-300 you might want to consider getting one of these. The ET4 is a good choice for a low-cost desktop 3D printer.

3DPrint.com was not paid for this review and I received no money from this review from Anet. Anet did provide me with a review copy of the printer to keep. Other sites charge thousands of dollars for 3D printer “reviews.” We do not do this. We also do not receive money from affiliate marketing from this article. You may disagree with my findings but these findings and opinions are made honestly and with a sincere wish to help you buy a printer, not with an ulterior motive.  

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by Carmen Lopez at November 12, 2019 06:51 AM

November 11, 2019

Thingiverse

MakerBot Continues to Expand the METHOD Platform with New Nylon Material

MakerBot Continues to Expand the METHOD Platform with New Nylon Material MakerBot Nylon enables advanced functional prototyping and end-use part Continue Reading

The post MakerBot Continues to Expand the METHOD Platform with New Nylon Material appeared first on MakerBot.

by MakerBot at November 11, 2019 10:37 PM

Fabbaloo

Farsoon's Powder-Eating CAMS System

The HT1001P CAMS continuous 3D printing system [Source: Farsoon]

The HT1001P CAMS continuous 3D printing system [Source: Farsoon]

Farsoon has...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 11, 2019 08:58 PM

Certain Desktop 3D Printers Suddenly On Sale

The RBX1 professional desktop 3D printer - on sale [Source: CEL-ROBOX]

The RBX1 professional desktop 3D printer - on sale [Source: CEL-ROBOX]

In...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 11, 2019 04:38 PM

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Exploded view of the Ultimate Cloud Cat Feeder [Source: Piotr Westfalewicz]

Exploded view of the Ultimate Cloud Cat Feeder [Source: Piotr Westfalewicz]

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 11, 2019 11:29 AM

3D Print.com

AM POLYMERS GmbH: New Polypropylene ROLASERIT PP03O for Laser Sintering with 200 % Elongation at Break and Other New Materials

AM POLYMERS GmbH expands its powder portfolio for laser sintering with a new polypropylene powder. In contrast to most of the materials on the market, the material has exceptionally high elongation at break of more than 200 %. At the same time, the material has excellent processing conditions on common machine systems.

AM POLYMERS GmbH presents its fourth series material from the ROLASERIT® family at FORMNEXT 2019 in Frankfurt and starts the BETA phase for the newly developed ROLASERIT® PP03O. This extends the material range for laser sintering to include a material with outstanding ductility and injection moulding properties. For the first time, a lower elongation at break has not to be accepted, as is generally the case in additive manufacturing.

With an elongation at break of more than 200 %, the material is a pioneering role in the field of materials for laser sintering. Most materials only have elongations at break in the range of less than 50 %. The processing of the material has already been tested successfully and without problems on common laser sintering systems. In accordance with the company philosophy of selling only plug-and-play materials, only short running-in times on the machines are necessary. Thus, the production of customer parts is possible within a few days. The application spectrum of manufactured components is diverse and ranges from simple housings to function-integrated parts with film hinges. Based on its high ductility, the ROLASERIT® PP03O is also ideally suited for series production.

Visit us at FORMNEXT 2019 booth 11.1 A79 to learn more about ROLASERIT® PP03O.

In addition to polypropylene PP01, polyethylene PEGR01 and TPU PB01, PP03O now forms the fourth thermoplastic powder available as series material, which AM POLYMERS has developed for laser sintering or for powder bed fusion and sells under the brand name ROLASERIT®.

AM POLYMERS GmbH will also be presenting other powder materials at FORMNEXT 2019. The newly developed ROLASERIT® PP04 is designed to offer a polypropylene with increased stiffness and strength requirements compared to PP01 and PP03. The ROLASERIT® PA FLEX01 is intended for applications with a requirement profile with low stiffness and simultaneously high ductility in laser sintering. The polyamide material has been specifically optimized for this special application.

AM POLYMERS GmbH with a headquarters in Willich was founded in 2014. The company is specialized in the development, production and distribution of laser sintering materials. The company’s team can look back on many years of experience in the field of additive manufacturing. The founders, Dr.-Ing. Andreas Wegner and Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Gerd Witt have twelve and more than twenty years of experience in laser sintering of plastics. Timur Ünlü, a specialist of many years experience in the field of powder production, joined the company in 2018. Since 2019 a new production and development site for the production of plastic powders has been established in Willich.
In addition to the commercialized products, other important standard thermoplastics such as PA6 or PBT are developed for laser sintering. The current state of development already shows promising properties of these future products.

Contact:
AM POLYMERS GmbH
Dr.-Ing. Andreas Wegner
Hanns-Martin-Schleyer-Straße 9e
47877 Duisburg
Germany
tel.: +49 174 2174251
email: info@am-polymers.de
web: https://www.am-polymers.de

The post AM POLYMERS GmbH: New Polypropylene ROLASERIT PP03O for Laser Sintering with 200 % Elongation at Break and Other New Materials appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Team AM Polymers at November 11, 2019 08:00 AM

3D Printing Congress in Argentina: Novel Ideas and a Harsh Landscape Ahead

A new edition of the 3D Printing Congress in Argentina wrapped up last Thursday after two days of workshops, supplier stands and speakers talking about the challenges and solutions of manufacturing using 3D printing. From biomaterials to resins, 3D printing in the automotive industry, 3D medical simulators and biomedical inventions, some of the most innovative uses for the technology show that it is advancing in the country, albeit somewhat slower than expected.

Sergio Cavaliere, Product and Applications Manager for Advanced Machine Systems (AMS), said to 3DPrint.com: “The local market is volatile, complex and caged by controls, yet at the general manufacturing level we notice that companies have begun acquiring additive manufacturing technology, perhaps not at the hyper expectation levels we forecasted five years ago, still, they know that if they don’t begin to use 3D printing, they will lose competitiveness.” 

Held 6 to 7 November in the City of Buenos Aires, the event gathered more than 3,500 3D printing enthusiasts, professionals, and researchers who eagerly discussed how to achieve better, cheaper and more efficient results, as well as what’s on the horizon for local 3D printing companies. This year’s main themes focused on 3D printing in industry and biomedicine. 

Last year, when the Mercedes Benz plant in Buenos Aires was looking to improve its production line of trucks and vans, they consulted Cavaliere and AMS. The manufacturing process specialists recommended they acquire an additive manufacturing machine to accelerate production. The local branch of the German vehicle maker soon began using a Stratasys F270 24/7 and in only 23 days created the devices needed for the manufacturing engineering of the assembly line.

Workshop: Creating unique shapes with the 3D pencil

“In general and around the world, almost 70% of all 3D printing is used for prototyping. However, this is not the case for Argentina, where industries are searching for ways to use the technology in manufacturing aids–like jigs, fixtures, platforms and tools (mainly in automotive). This means that they require more durable materials with high thermal and impact resistant qualities. And while most machines sold locally today are PLA printers that are very common for prototyping, they are not useful in manufacturing. That’s the reason our product sparked a lot of interest among attendees at the Congress,” suggested Demian Gawianski, CCO of Kodak 3D Printing during an interview with 3DPrint.com.

The very popular Kodak booth

Gawianski considers that 3D printing know-how has been growing in recent years, more focused on industry and engineering applications. In 2012, Argentina-based Smart International began developing and manufacturing 3D printers, and in 2018  released Kodak’s Portrait 3D printer, a new professional 3D printing solution developed through a global brand licensing agreement.

Furthermore, the team behind Kodak showcased parts that are being produced as part of their new segment, an alliance with renowned polymer manufacturers worldwide, such as BASF, Owens Corning, Clariant, and DSM.

“The pieces printed with our machines using BASF stainless steel are very alluring for manufacturers because they have 80% stainless steel and 20% of a polymer which after a few post-processes becomes 100% stainless steel,” explained Gawianski. “Our machines are certified to work with already established materials from large manufacturers, allowing our customers to develop engineering pieces with high resistance.”

Stainless steel gear made with BASF material 319 L, Kodak

Not to be missed was Juan Manuel Romero’s talk about his Game of Thrones spoons, made earlier this year exclusively and in partnership with HBO Latin America, just in time for the premiere of the world-wide awaited sixth and final season of the show. The innovative development even competed at Cannes’ International Festival of Creativity during the 2019 award season. 

“3D printing offers infinite novel possibilities for jewelry creations, characterization, and improved quality. The precision approach of the machines is an advantage to more traditional methods of creating jewelry,” said Romero to 3DPrint.com. “Back in 2014 we realized that we needed to scale production without losing the design edge, and 3D printing gave us all that and more.” 

Romero, the owner of Quimbaya, has been a goldsmith jeweler for over 10 years, yet he learned quickly that using 3D printing to go from design to molding makes a big difference towards his end product. He states that “morphologically, the jewelry design has no limit, while with conventional methods, the same level of accuracy could never be achieved.”

For his Game of Thrones spoons, he used Photocentric’s Precision 1.5 machines to create the prototype and the molds that were then used to make the metal spoons. The four spoons (representing the most iconic houses of the series: Stark, Lannister, Targaryen, and Greyjoy) traveled from Argentina to Europe with HBO, and became a very popular and desirable item due to the visibly unique quality, traits and intricate work. 

The very popular green shade PLA color

One of the most popular booths among attendees was PrintaLot. The company director, Mariano Perez​​, has underlined the success of his filaments, stating that: “Our client portfolio used to be made up mainly of hobbyists, and today we mostly get industrial market orders from companies that are driving the digital transformation of the industry”.

In this sense, he adds that “we began working with other markets in the region, like Brazil, which has a big demand for our products.” One of the biggest orders the company got from Brazilian clients was a request for a new PLA color, the green-blue shade made famous by jewelry maker Tiffany. 

“3D printing machines and materials are changing the production processes of different economic sectors and creating new business models. We also began reselling Wiiboox Sweetin, the gourmate food 3D printer, and Ultimaker, because we noticed many local entrepreneurs were searching for this type of solutions,” Mariano told 3DPrint.com.

In addition to the increasingly popular local 3D printer suppliers exhibiting the latest from MakerBot, Formlabs, BCN3D, and Trideo (one of the most popular local brands), new and creative applications drew big crowds. Examples include a surgical simulator; 3D bioprinters to treat wounds in diabetic patients; bespoke 3D printed titanium implants; and the WalkingMaker, a 3D printer with wheels that extrudes material obliquely.

Nicolas Meer, co-creator of a pediatric surgical simulator for medicine residents, said: “we spoke to pediatric surgeons who suggested the best way to teach the techniques of laparoscopy to students and future doctors was through a simulator, instead of waiting for a real case or practicing with animal parts. I have been working with 3D printers since 2012 so I decided to design and print a small simulator that wouldn’t cost more than $500.”

Even though spirits run high during the event, the landscape ahead is looking dim for the technology locally. With few endeavors and a complex economical situation, startups that once bet on creating their own technology, quickly noticed that it was better to import the printers from other countries. As is usual in the Latin American region, most of the machines being used come from Europe, Asia, and the US. Some of the best selling brands include Formlabs, Photocentric, MakerBot, and on the high end, Stratasys. Nonetheless, both political and economic uncertainty tends to drive up job losses, hold up the economy and seriously affect growth, so we can expect local companies will begin to look to other countries and regional markets to expand. Funding is limited and international investors are carefully looking at the local scenario ahead. However, interest is rising and every year, more people become knowledgeable of the technology, looking at the field as a reliable, creative and fundamental part of their work.

The team behind the Congress

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.
[Images: Kodak, 3D Printing Congress Argentina, Quimbaya, Print-a-Lot and 3DPrint.com]

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by Vanesa Listek at November 11, 2019 07:59 AM

Researchers from NCSU and UNC Create a 3D Biomedical Fiber Printer

It’s been 10 weeks since the NFL 2019 season began and already dozens of players have suffered soft tissue injuries. Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Christian Kirk is recovering from an ankle sprain while T.Y. Hilton from the Indianapolis Colts re-aggravated a quadriceps strain he sustained earlier this year just five weeks into the season. But this is just one sport were injuries run high and the risk of re-injury is even greater, especially since many try to return too quickly to the field. Sprains, strains, and contusions, as well as tendinitis and bursitis, are common soft tissue injuries in most contact sports, like football, rugby, ice hockey, soccer and more. Australian experts suggest that soft tissue injuries are the most common injury in sport, and they should know better since Australian Rules football and soccer had the highest population-based age-standardized rates of injury hospitalization. Soft tissue includes muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, nerves, fibrous tissues, fat, blood vessels, and synovial membranes, so it’s not really just sports players that need attention. Anyone can suffer from soft-tissue injuries, and even with the appropriate treatment, they may require surgery.

Yet, the challenges behind creating soft tissue have advanced slower than expected, with scientists even looking to develop tissue in space, using microgravity to accelerate development. However, last July, a team of researchers found a potentially transformative opportunity: applying 3D printing and non-woven fiber manufacturing to create new tissues that can grow in the human body. The Forging Interdisciplinary Bio-inspired Engineered Regenerative Science (FIBERS) team of researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have been exploring 3D printing strategies to make tissues such as the meniscus and tendons. One of the most significant advances so far has been a 3D biomedical fiber printer used to create biocompatible scaffolds.

The meniscus is an ideal starting place for the FIBERS project because of its complex, fibrous structure.

NCSU states that while a 3D printer can precisely reproduce the shapes and structures in an MRI image or a CT scan, traditional 3D printers may not appropriately capture features at the tiny scale that tissue engineering demands. The difference between traditional devices and the FIBERS advanced 3D printer is the way it forms fibers: in offering more variety in the size, shape, and orientation of the layers of fibers that form an object, matching the natural fibers they’re aiming to replace and regrow.

“With conventional 3D printing, that’s where you run into roadblocks. The feature sizes that you can make can be an order of magnitude too large,” said Rohan Shirwaiker, an NCSU associate professor of industrial and systems engineering.

The 3D printer was built with support from the Game-Changing Research Incentive Program (GRIP), a partnership of the NC State Office of Research and Innovation; RTI International; and the Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology and Science. They have a patent pending on the features of the process and have also applied for a second patent on the specific fiber geometry they have been able to produce with the machine.

“What we learned on the GRIP machine we could never do on a big pilot machine easily,” said Benham Pourdeyhimi, executive director of the Nonwovens Institute and the principal investigator for the FIBERS project. “So for me there were a couple of ‘AHA!’ moments. ‘Wow, if I could do that on a larger scale, it opens up opportunities outside of this domain for other applications.’”

Behnam Pourdeyhimi with the machine the team created to produce fiber-based flexible biocompatible scaffolds

According to NCSU, two questions have led the team’s work: How can you manufacture tissues at several scales, from micro to nano, with speed and repeatability? And what should those scaffolds be made of? So the focus has been on creating scaffolds, which give both form and direction to tissue growth.

“In the absence of scaffolds, we could still get bone cells and grow them on a petri dish. And they will multiply, but they won’t really grow and form the bone tissue that we need,” explained Shirwaiker.

Pourdeyhimi suggested that a scaffold’s mission is fleeting and sensitive so that once implanted, it needs to carry the load, then spark and shape cell growth, recruit other cells from inside the body, and finally disappear when the new tissue is able to function alone. And it needs to do all that without disrupting any of the cells and systems around it.

“We’re learning how to process materials that we’ve never processed before,” Pourdeyhimi said. “We’ve learned how to manipulate them and use more biofriendly types of polymers that the industry would need to use.”

A researcher loads the custom made 3D printer, which gives more control over the tissues created by the FIBERS project.

NCSU informed that in order to meet the challenges facing tissue engineering, the FIBERS team had to draw knowledge and expertise from biomedical and industrial engineering, textiles and veterinary medicine. Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) assistant professor Matt Fisher’s long-standing work on 3D printing tissues fits right in with the FIBERS initiative. Together with Shirwaiker, they were then invited to form the core team for the FIBERS project by BME Professor Frances Ligler and Pourdeyhimi.

Ligler claims that today, most transplanted tissues come from cadavers or the patients themselves, and there has been progress on using stem cells to repair damaged tissues, but neither approach delivers the level of customization that the human body demands.

“Once we get a handle on both the materials and the manufacturing, we can really leapfrog what’s going on in the regenerative medicine community,” Ligler suggested.

Matt Fisher, Stephanie Cone and Danielle Howe test synthetic soft tissues in Fisher’s robotics lab at NC State

So far, the research team’s work has focused on innovations that would improve the quality of life for the hundreds of thousands of people who get replacement soft tissues each year. Also, FIBERS investigators have recently requested funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) with a bigger mission in mind: to establish a national hub for regenerative tissue engineering at NCSU. Currently, 114,000 Americans are waiting for organ transplants, and the donor options are limited, so engineered tissues and organs hold the greatest promise for them.

Discuss this and other 3D printing topics at 3DPrintBoard.com or share your thoughts below.

[Images: North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill]

The post Researchers from NCSU and UNC Create a 3D Biomedical Fiber Printer appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Vanesa Listek at November 11, 2019 07:30 AM

Sigma Releases 3D Models For Its FP Camera 

It’s rare for camera companies to give people the chance to develop their own 3D printed accessories to use around the camera’s body. One camera company that has recently done this is Sigma, with their FP camera. Sigma has uploaded the 3D models for the FP camera body on their official website, which are available for everyone. 

The FP camera is Sigma’s first L mount camera, the world’s smallest and lightest full-frame mirrorless camera with interchangeable lens. FP was first announced at Photokina 2018 and this tiny camera seems to be pretty powerful. The FP is one of the most anticipated cameras of the last few years and is a small very compact full-frame camera. The camera is capable of shooting 12-Bit Cinema DNG RAW to an external SSD. It also has multiple 1/4-20″ threaded sockets, one underneath the camera for mounting a tripod, and one on each side. Central to the camera is the idea that it is a single module in a wide array of accessories that can be used to optimize it for, say, use as a video camera in a studio or through other optimized configurations. 

Image via Sigma Global

The 3D models for the camera body are useful for manufacturers that want to develop their own products such as grips, cages, and other accessories, to fit around the FP camera. Inventors and creative people at home could also use them to adapt the Sigma to their world.

Image via Cinema5d

It’d be nice if more camera companies started offering their camera’s 3D models for buyers who would love to do more with them. We know that 3D printed camera accessories are already a “thing” and there are some pretty creative minds out there. 

Image by Mathieu Stern

Photographers like Mathieu Stern, from France, created a lens made out of ice for his camera. Stern modified his Sony camera in order to fit and hold the ice lens by creating a 3D printed body. To accomplish the ice lens, Stern went to Diamond Beach, located in the east of Reykjavik, Iceland. There, he found an iceberg and, using a ball maker, he was able to extract a piece of ice. Later, after many tries, he created the ice lens and fit it into the lens holder he had 3D printed. With the ice lens, he achieved foggy and surreal images. 

Image via LEX Optical

Hobbyist Alexander Gee, who appreciates film cameras, is almost done creating something a bit different, the LEX camera. As Gee describes, “the LEX is a camera which lets you use your E-Mount lenses with your favorite film emulsions”. Gee likes to use a Sony E-Mount with native E-Mount lenses to shoot, but sometimes he likes the aesthetic film cameras provide, which are hard to find these days. The problem is that Sony is the only camera company that has never built a film camera, so Gee knew what it was needed to be done. According to him, he created “the world’s first Sony E-Mount 35mm film camera” by mixing 3D printing with soldering and electronics. By using the shutter mechanism from a Sony A7, he built the prototype of the LEX together with a 3D printed body of the camera with SLS nylon, which he later dyed and coated as to prevent any ambient light from entering the camera.

But Gee is not the only one who loves a good film camera. Dora Goodman makes open-source 3D printed cameras, as well as camera straps and other accessories. Goodman is part of a movement that is dedicated to making high-quality 3D printed projects with other design and photography enthusiasts in order to share their concepts and ideas with creative minds around the world. One of Goodman’s project is the Goodman One Camera, a camera she has been working for a long time. Her idea was to make a modular camera that could easily accept leaf shutter lenses, to dress up the classical film cameras in a more modern look. The open source projects are available to anyone with access to a 3D printer through the Goodman Lab website.

If other camera companies follow Sigma’s steps into releasing their cameras’ 3D models to everyone, people like Gee, Goodman, and Stern could create interesting and innovative accessories for cameras that can be used by anyone. Right now, Sigma has released 13 3D models and we can already appreciate users on DPReview discussing about the FP camera, and sharing creations with the rest of the community. 

Image via DPReview, by JMA60

One of DPReview’s user, “JMA60”, has created and 3D printed a grip for the FP camera. This user used Sigma’s 3D models and adapted it according to his needs. As the user shared, he was looking for something “more suitable for one-handed grasping”. Could this lead to more people participating in producing new camera accessories now that Sigma shared its 3D models? Hopefully, more camera companies will follow Sigma’s steps and will let anyone with a 3D printer design a better experience for using their cameras. 

[Sources: Sigma, DPReview, Cinema5d]

The post Sigma Releases 3D Models For Its FP Camera  appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing.

by Melisa Gonzalez at November 11, 2019 07:09 AM

Exploring the Possible: You don’t know everything about 3D printing… yet.

“We just want to see what is possible,” he said. I was speaking with a senior designer at a sporting goods manufacturer. His group was focused on all things innovation,... The post Exploring the...

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by David Busacker at November 11, 2019 06:58 AM

NYU Abu Dhabi Team Wins Hack3D Challenge

Two students from New York University Abu Dhabi won the first prize of the Hack3D challenge at New York University Tandon’s School of Engineering. Only five teams advanced to the... The post...

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by Vanesa Listek at November 11, 2019 05:01 AM

November 10, 2019

Fabbaloo

3D Print.com

Interview with Riddhi Maharaj on 3D Printing Space Systems in Africa

Riddhi Maharaj is a Materials Engineer at NewSpace Systems. In this interview, we discuss 3D printing with respect to Space components design, product development and Lean engineering. Can you...

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by Farai Mashambanhaka at November 10, 2019 07:59 AM

November 09, 2019

Fabbaloo

LulzBot Revived! Moves to Fargo?

LulzBot may not go away after all

LulzBot may not go away after all

A surprise announcement late yesterday...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 09, 2019 11:33 AM

3D Print.com

Beijing University of Chemical Technology: 3D Printed HA/PCL Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

3D printed bone scaffolds used for tissue engineering purposes need to have a good amount of mechanical strength, since the scaffold needs to be able to provide support for the... The post Beijing...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 09, 2019 07:08 AM

November 08, 2019

Fabbaloo

Engineering.COM 3D Printing

3D Printing in Construction: More than Overhyped Promises and Underwhelming Deliveries?

The number one material used in the global construction industry is concrete. Concrete as a standalone material is very cheap, but the cost of creating of creating formwork makes it expensive. The formwork used to be a huge source of waste in the construction industry in the developed world, as it was all thrown away at some point during every construction project. Now, they are largely reusable except in third world countries. By some estimates, the construction industry is responsible for crea...

by Andrew Wheeler at November 08, 2019 08:22 PM

Fabbaloo

Prusa No Longer Producing Loudspeakers

Waveform for the Prusa Research heat bed [Source: Prusa Research]

Waveform for the Prusa Research heat bed [Source: Prusa Research]

I’m...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 08, 2019 05:54 PM

Promoting Whiskey With 3D Printing?

Custom 3D printed sneakers, part of the Bulleit 3D Printed Frontier Experience [Source: The Drinks Business]

Custom 3D printed sneakers, part of the Bulleit 3D Printed Frontier Experience [Source: The Drinks Business]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 08, 2019 04:36 PM

Question of the Week: Fiber-Reinforced Filaments

A 3D print with embedded continuous carbon fiber [Source: Fabbaloo]

A 3D print with embedded continuous carbon fiber [Source: Fabbaloo]

This...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 08, 2019 02:23 PM

Kennametal Turns to AM to Drive Growth, Product Innovation

The Pennsylvania-based manufacturer sees 3D printing technology as an opportunity to augment and refine its product offerings.(Image courtesy of Kennametal.)

The Pennsylvania-based manufacturer sees 3D printing technology as an opportunity to augment and refine its...

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by ENGINEERING.com at November 08, 2019 11:33 AM

iMaterialise

Magics Essentials Tutorial: How To Prep Your Files Like A Pro

Importing design file without any errors is an art form. There’s been a lot of time we’ve wasted on fixing printing errors and details after converting a design to STL. And then still getting a frustrating message that “computer says no.”

Sound familiar? You’re not alone: more than 50% of models are not ready for printing once imported to STL format.

What if that step of getting your design print-ready could be that much easier and faster? What if you could make your prints cheaper?

Take the pain out of 3D printing by using three steps to prepare your files for printing like a pro using  Magics Essentials – made by i.materialise’s parent company, Materialise.

 

Step 1: Fix errors easily

Magics Essentials has two functions to help you quickly identify and correct errors that we’re all plagued with, including disjointed, misaligned, or overlapping pieces. You’ll find both tools in the “Fix” ribbon in Magics Essentials.

Essentials fix errors

At the top of your window, select the “Fix” ribbon to find “Shrink Wrap,” the “Fix Wizard” and “Auto-fix” at the top right.

  • AutoFix and Fix Wizard: These tools give you full control to automatically or manually fix errors. They find all the errors for you, and either fix them straight-away (Autofix) or help you choose how you’d like to fix them (FixWizard). In FixWizard, you can select which types of errors the software should fix by itself, allowing you to focus on the important ones – or you can just let it show you the problems, and you can adjust the details by hand, finetuning the fixes as you go.
  • ShrinkWrap: ShrinkWrap does what it says on the tin: it applies a film around your parts to smooth out and remove any imperfections. This tool is particularly useful if you’ve scanned a 3D model, or you’re printing a design made up of several parts. Just press the button, and voilà all the errors are magically fixed.

To see how to use these tools, check out this tutorial.

 

Step 2: Perfect colors and textures

One great thing about Magics Essentials is that you can map the colors and textures directly from your CAD file – just make sure to check the two boxes when you import. This can save you tons of time when you’re working with a multi-colored design. But remember, this is only applicable if you want to print in plastics. You’ll find all the options to finesse these aspects in the “Textures” ribbon:

Essentials perfect colors

At the top of your window, select the “Textures” ribbon to find options for textures and colors.

Check out this video to see it in action.

And in case you’re curious, you can check out the full i.materialise range of plastics and color printing options. Between the tools and the materials, you can truly create the look, feel, and function to bring you design to life.

 

Step 3: Optimize for printing

Now you’ve waved some digital wands and got your design almost ready to print, you can think about the last few practicalities of your print.

For this last step, you’ll be working in the “Tools” ribbon.

Essentials tools

At the top of your window, select the “Tools” ribbon to find options to cut and hollow your object.

Here, there are two particularly important key features:

  • Cutting: Maybe it’s a large item, and you’d like to cut it into pieces so it’s faster to print, or even so that it’ll fit through letterboxes when you send it to your customers. For that, you’ll want to use the cutting options. Check out the tutorial here to learn about all the options for cutting and re-building your pieces, using straight cuts, puzzle-style teeth, pin and hole combinations and so many more.
  • Hollowing: So maybe, you’re a little bit shocked by the price or weight of the final piece. No worries – you can use nifty tools to hollow out your design entirely or keep just a honeycomb structure inside. Either way, this will make your object lighter and cheaper because it’s faster to print and uses less material. Watch how to apply a honeycomb structure to your part here.

And there you have it. Three key steps, intuitive tools and time saved. Now press “upload” and check out as usual on the i.materialise website.

Just think, using these steps, you can spend more time doing the things you love – whether that’s sculpting amazing pieces or solving problems for your customers in the blink of an eye.

And don’t worry if you haven’t got Magics Essentials yet – try out the software free on a 30-day trial, then if you love it as much as we think you will, here’s 30% off your first purchase: YOURLUCKYDAY

Click here to get the free trial from the Magics Essentials webpage!

Please read these conditions for more details:

  • This offer is limited in time and only valid for 15 days, starting on the day the blog post is published.
  • To benefit from the offer, you need to subscribe to the free trial of the yearly subscription of Essentials.
  • This offer is only applicable to the yearly subscription plan.
  • Price of €89/month is applicable for the first year only. The total promotional price of €1.068 will be deducted at the end of the trial period. When the subscription is renewed the full price as displayed on the website will be applicable.
  • Only for new customers of Magics Essentials

 

by juliet at November 08, 2019 10:23 AM

3D Print.com

Forensic Doctors Used 3D Printing to Create a Low-Cost Post Mortem Set

Criminal investigations, unusual deaths, victims of disasters and hospital quality controls rely heavily on autopsies. In the field of forensic medicine, the body is crucial evidence and can provide...

View the entire article via our website.

by Vanesa Listek at November 08, 2019 09:54 AM

Interview with Wei Jian Goh of Craft Health on Personalized Medicine and Nutrition

Wei Jian Goh’s startup Craft Health makes personalized medicine and nutrition possible. The startup is one I’m very envious of as I’ve had a lot of ideas in this area... The post...

View the entire article via our website.

by Joris Peels at November 08, 2019 08:00 AM

SLA 3D Printing Anthropomorphic Phantom Structures for Neonates

In the recently published ‘An anthropomorphic phantom representing a prematurely born neonate for digital X-ray imaging using 3D printing: Proof of concept and comparison of image quality from...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 08, 2019 07:34 AM

Interview with Hans Fouche on his African Large Scale Pellet 3D Printer the Cheetah

Hans Fouche is an Inventor and Engineer, who is fascinated with 3D Printing. In this interview, we discuss his invention, which is the Cheetah 3D printer and his outlook on... The post Interview...

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by Farai Mashambanhaka at November 08, 2019 06:55 AM

3D Printing News Briefs: November 8, 2019

We’ve got plenty of business news for you in today’s 3D Printing News Briefs, starting with 3devo’s upcoming expansion to the United States. Optomec just shipped its 500th 3D...

View the entire article via our website.

by Sarah Saunders at November 08, 2019 06:00 AM

November 07, 2019

Fabbaloo

Ê+xúÚr؜jS¶¡ýÃ>¸§¶)à *ܺ+l

Testing a 3D printed circuit: it works! [Source: ScienceDirect]

Testing a 3D printed circuit: it works! [Source: ScienceDirect]

Researchers at...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 07, 2019 05:55 PM

A "Personal Car Factory 3D Printer" Coming Next Year?

Concept for the upcoming Modix MAMA car-sized industrial 3D printer [Source: Modix]

Concept for the upcoming Modix MAMA car-sized industrial 3D printer [Source: Modix]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 07, 2019 05:49 PM

3D Print.com

How 3D Printing Jigs and Fixtures Transforms Manufacturing Part II – All About Fixtures

Fixtures are essential for custom manufacturers. Fixtures hold the workpiece in place so it does not move during a step in manufacturing. Some shapes are easy to hold such as... The post How 3D...

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by Team Shapeways at November 07, 2019 04:30 PM

Fabbaloo

Z«x‹ºÚzÉ,Ü3ëŠ{bž,±ë,™éíNŠ%

A construction industry self-assessment tool [Source: Autodesk]

A construction industry self-assessment tool [Source: Autodesk]

I believe...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 07, 2019 02:43 PM

Engineering.COM 3D Printing

Desktop Metal Introduces Carbon Fiber 3D Printer

After raising $436.8 million in total startup funding, Desktop Metal has already moved onto the introduction of its third 3D printing platform and beyond metal. In addition to its extrusion-based and binder jetting metal 3D printers, the firm has developed a continuous reinforcement fiber 3D printing process dubbed micro automated fiber replacement (μAFP). The technology features two printheads, one for 3D printing thermoplastic and another for laying down tape made from continuous fiber r...

by Michael Molitch-Hou at November 07, 2019 11:10 AM

3D Print.com

PolyDry by Filaments.ca: Industrial Grade, Automatic Humidity-Controlled Filament Storage Unit

Moisture in 3D printing filaments has been a well-known issue in the industry for some time now. While many solutions have been introduced over the years to combat the problem... The post PolyDry by...

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by Ron Rivkind at November 07, 2019 09:48 AM

Aki Inomota – Think Evolution #1

This is an art analysis of a 3D printed piece done by the artist Aki Inomata. It brings out questions of humanity and our finite nature. The post Aki Inomota – Think Evolution #1 appeared...

View the entire article via our website.

by Ese Osaghae at November 07, 2019 08:32 AM

3D Printed: The Radiotherapy-Compatible Robotic System

In ‘Radiotherapy-Compatible Robotic System for Multi-Landmark Positioning in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments,’ authors Mark Ostyn, Siqiu Wang, Yun-Soung Kim, Siyong Kim, and Woon-Hong Yeo discuss the...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 07, 2019 08:03 AM

Michigan Technological University: 3D Printed Molecular Models for Chemistry

In the recently published ‘Printing 3D Models for Chemistry,’ authors Elisabeth Grace Billman-Benveniste, Jacob Franz, and Loredana Valenzano-Slough–all from Michigan Technological...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 07, 2019 07:48 AM

Interview with Elizabeth Rogers of Kuunda 3D and Daniel Martinez of Copper 3D on Copper 3D Antimicrobial 3D Printing

                        The 3D printing industry continues to experience more great gradual improvements. Special mention goes to the...

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by Farai Mashambanhaka at November 07, 2019 07:46 AM

Scaled Presents a 3D Printed Chassis Concept

Founded in 2015, Swindon-based engineering company Scaled is on a mission to, as its website states, “bring large scale 3D printing technology to production environments across the UK.”...

View the entire article via our website.

by Sarah Saunders at November 07, 2019 06:00 AM

November 06, 2019

Fabbaloo

First Flame Retardant Material for SLA 3D Printing Now Available

A new 3D printable photopolymer resin that is certified flame retardant [Source: Cubicure]

A new 3D printable photopolymer resin that is certified flame retardant [Source: Cubicure]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 06, 2019 05:53 PM

§‚)àNºÈ§zË ¡×¥ZŠä³pǹ»Ɩ§v)à

This large group is only some of 3D Hubs’ current staff [Source: 3D Hubs]

This large group is only some of 3D Hubs’ current staff [Source: 3D Hubs]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 06, 2019 04:22 PM

Sculpteo

Fabbaloo

Engineering.COM 3D Printing

Training the Next Generation of Engineers for Additive Manufacturing

Additive manufacturing (AM) is rapidly gaining viability in mass production, which means that it’s even more important for students entering the workforce to understand how to use and design for this technology. At the same time, emerging AM tools that make mass production possible are so new that it can be difficult to get the hands-on experience necessary to be the ideal workplace candidate. Fortunately, there are schools and programs that provide training for even the newest AM systems...

by Michael Molitch-Hou at November 06, 2019 02:28 PM

Sculpteo

Fabbaloo

Robinz Blog

U.S. get rid of one obsolete measurement unit, time for the rest

I only discovered the bizarre U.S. Survey foot after encountering it in a CAD file. I did the foot > metre conversion on an incoming imperial file and none of the resulting measurements made sense as were ‘a tiny bit out’. Turned out the file was actually created in U.S. Survey Feet, slightly different to normal ‘Feet’. The international foot is defined to be equal to exactly 0.3048 metres. United States survey foot are defined as exactly ​12003937 meters, approximately 0.304800609601 metres. Now this historical unit has been discontinued:

The U.S. Survey Foot Has Outlived Its Usefulness – RIP | Lidar News

“...a decision to discontinue the use of a specific measurement unit) the U.S. Survey foot…”

Sadly they are replacing it with the wrong unit…

the “U.S. survey foot” will be superseded by the “foot” (formerly known as the “international foot”), which is already in use throughout the U.S

Time to move to truly coherent system of units of measurement U.S.A, feet are for walking.

by RobiNZ at November 06, 2019 11:11 AM

3D Print.com

Rochester Institute of Technology: Creating Reactive Metal Inks for 3D Printing

In the recently published ‘Three Dimensional Digital Alloying with Reactive Metal Inks,’ author Chaitanya G. Mahajan submitted a dissertation for a PhD at the Kate Gleason College of Engineering...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 06, 2019 09:09 AM

Dezeen Day Recap

This is a mini summary of some things I picked up on from the Dezeen Day conference. It is only a small understatement of the stimulating environment. The post Dezeen Day Recap appeared first on...

View the entire article via our website.

by Ese Osaghae at November 06, 2019 08:37 AM

3D Printed WHO Bioassay Kit Parts Could Help Combat Malaria

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), malaria is a mosquito-born disease caused by a parasite. While roughly less than 2,000 cases are diagnosed annually in the... The...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 06, 2019 08:12 AM

Advancing the Development of 3D Printing Materials by Fostering Collaborative Partnerships Globally and Locally

Unlocking new opportunities in additive manufacturing is a collaborative effort that brings together technologies and expertise to identify needs and create comprehensive solutions along the product...

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by Sumeet Jain at November 06, 2019 08:10 AM

Sintering Thermoset Composites at High Temperatures for Aerospace Applications

In ‘Laser Sintering of Thermoset Polyimide Composites,’ authors Kathy C. Chuang, Timothy J. Gornet, Kate Schneidu, and Hilmar Koerner explore additive manufacturing with blended materials, meant to...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 06, 2019 07:09 AM

Ponoko

Holiday Order Deadlines 2019

Order By These Deadlines To Get Your Parts In Time

Just because Silent Night was quiet doesn’t mean that it can’t be merry and bright. Light up your holiday season by stocking up on all your laser cut parts. Order by the deadlines and receive all your custom parts in time.

Keep in mind that while Christmas is the most wonderful time of the year, it’s also the busiest time of year for us as well as for carriers.

The post Holiday Order Deadlines 2019 appeared first on Ponoko.

by Lisa Horn at November 06, 2019 03:07 AM

Black Friday Every Day For The Rest Of The Month

Save 25% On Laser Cutting With This Special Offer From November 6 Through December 2, 2019

At Ponoko, we have a mission: To help you make
your products, build your business and change the world with our cloud-to-robot
laser cutting service. We want to help you go from idea to product to market,
10x faster and at less cost than ever before.

So this year, rather than making you wait until the end of the month,

The post Black Friday Every Day For The Rest Of The Month appeared first on Ponoko.

by Lisa Horn at November 06, 2019 02:46 AM

November 05, 2019

Fabbaloo

Take Control of Metal 3D Print Quality With VELO3D's Assure System

The Assure system shows protrusions on a recently completed metal 3D print layer [Source: VELO3D]

The Assure system shows protrusions on a recently completed metal 3D print layer [Source: VELO3D]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 05, 2019 08:54 PM

3D Print.com

SABIC’s EXTEM AMHH811F: Roboze Announces New Polyimide Filament

Roboze continues to focus on manufacturing 3D printers while placing a strong emphasis on materials science too—allowing them to offer superior digital fabrication tools to industrial users around...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 05, 2019 06:47 PM

Fabbaloo

Stratasys To Collaborate With Jay Leno

Jay Leno with his own Fortus 450mc 3D printer [Source: Stratasys]

Jay Leno with his own Fortus 450mc 3D printer [Source: Stratasys]

Stratasys...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 05, 2019 05:58 PM

Sculpteo

Fabbaloo

ExOne’s New X1 160PRO Metal 3D Printer

The ExOne X1 160PRO metal 3D printer [Source: ExOne]

The ExOne X1 160PRO metal 3D printer [Source: ExOne]

ExOne announced a brand...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 05, 2019 04:32 PM

3D Print.com

VELO3D Releases Assure for 3D Metal Printing: Stratasys Direct Manufacturing as First Customer

With the release of the VELO3D Assure™ Quality Assurance and Control System for its Sapphire® 3D metal printers, VELO3D also brings on board a heavy hitter in their first customer... The post VELO3D...

View the entire article via our website.

by Bridget O'Neal at November 05, 2019 03:00 PM

Fabbaloo

Why The Rush To Metal 3D Printing?

Chart of predicted ratios of metal 3D printing processes [Source: SmarTech Analysis]

Chart of predicted ratios of metal 3D printing processes [Source: SmarTech Analysis]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 05, 2019 02:29 PM

3D Print.com

Tuskegee University Selected by NASA to Advance Additive Manufacturing in Aerospace

The aerospace industry is a trendsetter when it comes to manufacturing. It is a major industry that evolved its expertise into lighter material, efficient engines and overall safer machines....

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by Vanesa Listek at November 05, 2019 02:00 PM

Big Dog, Jay Leno & Stratasys Collaborate in 3D Printing Parts for Hundreds of Classic Autos

Even if you weren’t a big “Tonight Show” fan, you are probably aware that Jay Leno loves cars—and especially the classics. He has been connected to 3D printing before, but... The post Big Dog, Jay...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 05, 2019 01:26 PM

ExOne Introduces X1 160PRO for Manufacturing Low Cost 3D Printed Metal Parts

ExOne has been making binder jetting 3D printers for years now. The firm has developed processes to make sand cores and to use binder jetting to make metal parts. Where... The post ExOne Introduces...

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by Joris Peels at November 05, 2019 01:00 PM

3D Printing News Briefs: November 5, 2019

We’ve got some formnext announcements to start off today’s 3D Printing News Briefs – atum3D is introducing its newest DLP 3D printer, while Incus GmbH plans to launch its...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 05, 2019 11:50 AM

Fabbaloo

Book of the Week: Building Open Source Hardware

Building Open Source Hardware [Source; Amazon]

Building Open Source Hardware [Source; Amazon]

This week’s selection is “...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 05, 2019 11:19 AM

3D Print.com

FRESH News: SLAM Used to Fabricate Complex Hydrogel Structures With Gradients

There has been plenty of research on creating 3D printed hydrogels and using them to fabricate functional tissues. Biopolymer hydrogels, with properties that can be tailored and controlled, can...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 05, 2019 07:52 AM

November 04, 2019

Fabbaloo

Have You Considered Vacuum-Drying Your 3D Printer Filament?

AMTechniques’ new vacuum filament dryer [Source: AMTechniques]

AMTechniques’ new vacuum filament dryer [Source: AMTechniques]

There’s a...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 04, 2019 08:48 PM

Dramatically Faster Resin 3D Printing Process Developed

Experimental very high speed HARP 3D printer [Source: Science]

Experimental very high speed HARP 3D printer [Source: Science]

Researchers from...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 04, 2019 05:50 PM

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Incredibly spherical metal particles made by the Unimelt process [Source: 6K Additive]

Incredibly spherical metal particles made by the Unimelt process [Source: 6K Additive]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 04, 2019 04:30 PM

3D Print.com

Stratasys & DSM Venturing Lead $12 Million Round in Support of Inkbit

Stratasys and DSM Venturing (venture capital arm of Royal DSM) lead the way in yet more financing for startups, acting as the major sources of funding support of $12 million total,... The post...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 04, 2019 01:00 PM

Fabbaloo

Design of the Week: Giant Hot End

A giant 3D printed 3D printer hot end [Source: Thingiverse]

A giant 3D printed 3D printer hot end [Source: Thingiverse]

This week’s...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 04, 2019 11:33 AM

3D Print.com

Researchers Assess the Use of 3D Printing Geo-Polymer Concrete

In the recently published ‘Life Cycle Assessment of 3D Printing Geo-polymer Concrete: An Ex-ante Study,’ authors Yue Yao, Mingming Hu, Francesco Di Maio, and Stefano Cucurachi examine the development...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 04, 2019 09:16 AM

Formlabs Tells Us How to Make Good Looking 3D Printed Dentures

More than 36 million Americans do not have any teeth, and 120 million people in the US are missing at least one tooth. With these numbers expected to grow in... The post Formlabs Tells Us How to...

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by Vanesa Listek at November 04, 2019 08:27 AM

An Overview of Inexpensive CAD Options for 3D Printing

We live in a great time, where we have not only affordable 3D printers but also many great CAD programs available for free, so you can easily design anything you... The post An Overview of...

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by David Wieland at November 04, 2019 08:18 AM

Jobs at Formnext 2019

The additive manufacturing trade show Formnext is arguably the biggest event in the AM industry in Europe, if not in the world. The annual event, held in Frankfurt, Germany, hosts... The post Jobs...

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by Team IamDigital at November 04, 2019 07:48 AM

November 03, 2019

Fabbaloo

What? Desktop Metal Is Doing Desktop Plastic?

The Fiber continuous carbon fiber 3D printer [Source: Desktop Metal]

The Fiber continuous carbon fiber 3D printer [Source: Desktop Metal]

In a...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 03, 2019 11:29 AM

3D Print.com

Is This the Best Way to Manually Post-Process an FDM 3D Printed Part?

Researchers Jinjin Liu, Hai Gu, Bin Li, Lu Zhu, Jie Jiang, and Jie Zhang from the Nantong Institute of Technology and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of 3D Printing Equipment and Application published a...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 03, 2019 05:00 AM

AnelleO: 3D Printing to Create Devices for HIV Prevention, Birth Control and Infertility

Women and girls are disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, comprising more than half of the estimated 37.9 million people living with the disease. Moreover, according to United Nations...

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by Vanesa Listek at November 03, 2019 05:00 AM

November 02, 2019

Terry Wohlers

Revving the Engine with AM

Note: Ray Huff, associate engineer at Wohlers Associates, authored the following.

The automotive industry has been a major player in the use of AM over the past 30 years, beginning with rapid product development and prototyping. In the past few years, we have begun to glimpse the possibilities of AM as a tool for end-use production parts in automotive. Among the parts we have seen are custom trim pieces, HVAC components, parking brake brackets, and lightweight convertible top mounts. We’ve also seen power window guide rails, high-performance brake calipers, and even fully printed car bodies.

Many of these parts are made in low- or medium-production quantities. BMW touted its polymer guide rail production speeds of 100 parts per day using HP Jet Fusion technology. The guide rail, shown above, is installed in the i8 Roadster sports car, a limited-production vehicle. The same can be said for Bugatti’s Chiron brake caliper and the Olli self-driving shuttle, which are both low-volume products. Perfecting these production methods could certainly translate to higher-volume models in the future, and the proving of the technology with these use cases builds a strong argument for doing so.

At a recent National Manufacturing Day round-table discussion, Ford chief technology officer Ken Washington clearly stated his hope for AM-driven innovation in the automotive sector. “We’re going to see an adoption of the mindset of designing for additive, which is going to unlock all kinds of new innovations, new ways to bring products to life, and new experiences for customers. You couldn’t do this before because you didn’t have the tools.”

As companies such as Ford, Volkswagon, and others continue to adopt AM for production, we expect to see a new range of parts. Lightweight and topology-optimized frame members, handles, and wheels are on the horizon. As metals and high-temperature polymers are perfected and tested for long-term use, we will see engine blocks, pistons, valves, pumps, pulleys, and other parts made by AM. These parts have been seen in testing, with promising performance gains and weight savings. Only time will tell where the intersection of production cost and speed by AM will meet market demand.

by Terry Wohlers at November 02, 2019 01:46 PM

Fabbaloo

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Can 3D printing waste be recycled to create a sustainable material lifecycle?

Can 3D printing waste be recycled to create a sustainable material lifecycle?

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 02, 2019 10:16 AM

3D Print.com

Interview with Aaron Breuer, the CEO of SelfCAD

With perhaps only ten to twenty million people being proficient in CAD we can maintain that everyone could or should 3D print but the reality is that this isn’t in... The post Interview with...

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by Joris Peels at November 02, 2019 06:31 AM

November 01, 2019

Fabbaloo

Managing the Detroit 3D Printing STEM Skills Gap

University of Michigan [Source: Ken Lund]

University of Michigan [Source: Ken Lund]

Charles Goulding and Greer Veon of...

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by Charles Goulding at November 01, 2019 07:54 PM

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Hernan Lauber at the beginning of the chocolate making process [Source: oodaalolly]

Hernan Lauber at the beginning of the chocolate making process [Source: oodaalolly]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 01, 2019 04:51 PM

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How can one get involved in 3D printing? [Source: Fabbaloo]

How can one get involved in 3D printing? [Source: Fabbaloo]

This week’s...

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by Kerry Stevenson at November 01, 2019 03:17 PM

Robinz Blog

Can AutoCAD Architecture Projects live on BIM 360?*

A recent promotion announcing Civil 3D availability on BIM 360 Design had me wondering if AutoCAD Architecture (ACA) projects would work using BIM 360 Docs with the Autodesk Desktop Connector.

If so it would be rather useful for legacy projects. ACA projects have some odd control files (xml but with different extensions) but creating a new project worked and sync'd perfectly.

Annotation 2019-10-31 210115

I could create content, model and views, add annotation and place views on sheets as normal. Not surprising given ACA was just operating in the local Desktop Connector folder and syncing up to BIM 360. Even the file access intensive project standards update (to standards files still on the network) worked although rather slowly.

So far so good, but then the snag which kills it all. The local BIM 360 ‘Drives’ are actually folders in the current Windows User folder: C:\Users\[CURRENT USER]\BIM 360.

That means all the file pathing in the project can only work for one user at a time. If a second user attempts to open the project AutoCAD Architecture realises it needs to be re-pathed, attempts to do it, then fails. That is because the Desktop Connector demand syncs so only the file opened is on that users machine. That is the deal breaker.


* This post is an example of ‘Betteridge's law of headlines

by RobiNZ at November 01, 2019 08:02 AM

3D Print.com

Reinforcing Concrete Fabric Formwork with 3D Printed Plastics

In the recently published ‘Tailored flexibility: reinforcing concrete fabric formwork with 3D printed plastics,’ authors Jon Engholt and Dave Pigram create a construction system integrating robotics...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 01, 2019 07:46 AM

LiDar and its Applications Part 4 – Agriculture

This article takes us on a journey to realizing the scope of technology and how it can assist traditional and vital fields such as farming in ways that are very productive and tangible. The post...

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by Ese Osaghae at November 01, 2019 07:09 AM

3D Printing News Briefs: November 1, 2019

In this Halloween week edition of 3D Printing News Briefs, we’re telling you about a report, an agreement, and 3D printed footwear. SmarTech Analysis has released its market analysis...

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by Sarah Saunders at November 01, 2019 06:48 AM

ANET N4 V1.60 DLP 3D Printer Product Review

This is a brief overview of the Anet N4 V1.60 resin printer. I have praises mostly for Anet with a few areas of improvement that are brought up in my overall product review. The post ANET N4 V1.60...

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by Ese Osaghae at November 01, 2019 06:35 AM

Novamid AM1030 FR: Royal DSM Releases Flame-Retardant FDM Material

While Royal DSM, hailing from the Netherlands, is a global company based on science and promoting sustainability for individuals and industries everywhere, they continue to make substantial impacts...

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by Bridget O'Neal at November 01, 2019 05:59 AM

October 31, 2019

Fabbaloo

3D Printing in India: An Overview

Some of the 3D printing vendors covered by I3DPn [Source: I3DPn]

Some of the 3D printing vendors covered by I3DPn [Source: I3DPn]

While...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 31, 2019 07:59 PM

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A finely detailed ceramic 3D print (not made with the process described herein) [Source: Fabbaloo]

A finely detailed ceramic 3D print (not made with the process described herein) [Source: Fabbaloo]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 31, 2019 04:53 PM

Goofoo: 3D Printers from China

The Goofoo Nova 3D printer [Source: Fabbaloo]

The Goofoo Nova 3D printer [Source: Fabbaloo]

I happened to run into some folks...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 31, 2019 03:42 PM

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Electric 3D printing simulation — Image Source: RepRap Ltd

Electric 3D printing simulation — Image Source: RepRap Ltd

Charles...

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by Charles Goulding at October 31, 2019 01:22 PM

iMaterialise

3D Printing for Product Design

3D printing allows us to dream. Not just because the freedom of design it enables is limitless, but because it’s a good way to test out our ideas and designs in the real world. This is especially useful for product designers like Elia Furgiuele.

3D-printed protoypes in polyamide (SLS)

Cuttlery prototypes. Polyamide (SLS) dyed black

Elia Furgiuele is a Swiss Industrial Designer who uses i.materialise to 3D print prototypes for his designs, and he can tell us a thing or two about how to use 3D printing to improve the design of his products to perfection.

He graduated in 2009 from the Technical Industrial Designer (SSSAA) course at CSIA in Lugano. He has worked as a building and industrial designer and since 2016 he is flying solo as a freelance industrial designer.

Elia has been designing for 3D printing since high school and is well aware of the important role that 3D printing plays in the process of creating a good design.

3D-printed prototypes in polyamide (SLS)

3D-printed cardholders. Polyamide (SLS) and concrete

From idea to 3D print

Elia explains a bit more about the 3D design process that he follows:

 “Usually, I use 3D printing to test dimensions, ergonomics, space, proportion, and usability. Using different colors and materials could add value and give a strong identity to my products.”

His favorite 3D design software is Creo Parametric.“It’s fast, user-friendly and it allows me to check the design thoroughly in a simple and intuitive way“. He even taught students how to use this design software in a class in collaboration with Parametric Design Suisse.

3D-printed card holder. Alumide Yellow dyed

3D-printed cardholder. Alumide Blue dyed

I use 3D printing to test dimensions, ergonomics, space, proportions and usability. Using different colors and materials could add value and give a strong identity to my products.

Prototyping for the best design

Elia 3D prints his prototypes in Polyamide (SLS) because he can choose from a wide variety of colors and because it’s more affordable than the other materials.  “For the final product, I can choose the right material in terms of consistency, weight, reflection, color, and connotation”.

Design is also very important for the perfect 3D print: “Firstly, I would recommend being as clean as possible when creating your design in whatever software. Secondly, it’s important to consider the thickness of your design in order to remove unnecessary material and save money.”

3D-printed protoypes in polyamide (SLS)

Cuttlery prototypes. Polyamide (SLS) dyed black

Elia also suggests spending some time (and money) to print prototypes before printing a final product with a specific material, to be sure that your product works in real life.

For the final product I can choose the right material in terms of consistency, weight, reflection, color and connotation.

A 3D printing solution for each design

One of his recent projects is a cutlery set. “It was a big challenge because instead of thinking about one element, you have to think about a set of things that need coherence and consistency among them to make them feel part of the same family of ideas. After I had a clear idea, I used 3D printing to test the design!”

3D-printed protoypes in polyamide (SLS)

3D-printed cardholder. Polyamide (SLS) Yellow dyed

Another recent design is a cardholder. The original idea was to create a magazine holder but due to dimension limitations, Elia 3D printed the card stand instead to test the design. He also 3D printed a mold in standard resin to create the perfectly shaped finished concrete cardholder.

3D-printed mold in resin

Cardholder in concrete. Made with a 3D-printed mold

Design and materials, never-ending ideas

3D printing offers many options for designers in terms of materials, as well as the possibility to create prototypes and short series of products.

Elia has a project for an ashtray now and he wants to try alumide and copper for his product design projects.

“I also want to use rubber-like materials for some fashion design. Another idea I have is to use ABS for junctions to make a library, a table, and a chair”, says Elia.

3D printing in Alumide- Orange dye

Ashtray by Elia Furgiele. Alumide – Orange dyed

Discover more stories on our blog about prototyping with 3D printing and product design.

If you want to follow Elia’s steps and design your models in PTC’s Creo software, you can print your designs directly through i.materialise thanks to the integration of both tools.

If you are using another 3D design software, you can easily upload your 3D files to our 3D printing platform and get an instant quote for your 3D prints.

by Aura Farrando at October 31, 2019 08:35 AM

3D Print.com

Korea: 3D Printing Complex Transparent Displays

In the recently published ‘High-Resolution 3D Printing of Freeform, Transparent Displays in Ambient Air,’ researchers from Korea are studying complex geometries in the form of optoelectronic...

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by Bridget O'Neal at October 31, 2019 06:20 AM

Recycling in Additive Manufacturing: Coming Full Circle with End-of-Life Glass Fiber Reinforced Composites

In the recently published ‘Remanufacturing of end-of-life glass-fiber reinforced composites via UV-assisted 3D printing,’ authors Andrea Mantelli, Marinella Levi, Stefano Turri, and Raffaella...

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by Bridget O'Neal at October 31, 2019 06:00 AM

Coding for 3D Part 7: Doodlebug

This is a brief update of tool utilization within Rhino and how I plan to pivot a bit of my focus in this series. The post Coding for 3D Part 7: Doodlebug appeared first on 3DPrint.com | The Voice...

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by Ese Osaghae at October 31, 2019 05:55 AM

LiDar and its Applications Part 3 – Micro-Topography

Topographic Map Briefly in the previous article, I brought up a topic or domain that is vital for different LiDar applications. In college, I distinctly remember in some of my... The post LiDar and...

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by Ese Osaghae at October 31, 2019 05:45 AM

Wyss Institute will Help Combat Viral Threats with 3D Printed Organ-on-a-Chips

There is no doubt that viral disease transmission is a risk to many countries, one that requires a coordinated international response and a strong scientific basis to feed our understanding... The...

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by Vanesa Listek at October 31, 2019 05:19 AM

ACCIONA Inaugurates 3D Printing Center in Dubai for Construction and Infrastructure Applications

Global renewable energy, infrastructure, water, and services company ACCIONA, headquartered in Madrid, opened its first Middle East office in the UAE city of Dubai back in 2008. The company...

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by Sarah Saunders at October 31, 2019 05:17 AM

Fabbaloo

FORECAST 3D Acquired By GKN Powder Metallurgy

FORECAST 3D has been acquired [Source: Fabbaloo]

FORECAST 3D has been acquired [Source: Fabbaloo]

This is a bit of a surprise:...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 31, 2019 04:59 AM

October 30, 2019

Fabbaloo

More 3D Print Resellers Needed!

Many 3D printers are sold through resellers, but are there enough of them? [Source: Fabbaloo]

Many 3D printers are sold through resellers, but are there enough of them? [Source: Fabbaloo]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 30, 2019 07:55 PM

Jeremy Cook

Binho Host Adapter with Adafruit Alphanumeric FeatherWing Display

After doing an initial review of the Binho host adapter device on Hackster.io, my next task was to test it out in a “real world” usage scenario. In this case it meant experimenting with the Adafruit .54” Quad Alphanumeric FeatherWing display. The display communicates with the world via I2C, and in my opinion represents one of the most interesting use cases for the Binho USB Host adapter: sending I2C (and likely SPI) signals directly.

In other words, while it’s easy enough to use I2C via Arduino libraries and the like, actually understanding how things work is generally kept behind the scenes. If you want to dive deeper, the binho device will allow you to input I2C commands on the binary/hex level. Once you’ve mastered that, you can plug in an I2C device and check out its functionality directly, without being held back by the constraints of a particular library. Pretty neat.

Initial Experiment

For initial experimentation, the Adafruit device was hooked up on a breadboard, with I00 on the included adapter controlling the SDA line and, I02 attached to SCL. The Binho 5V bus and ground were used to power the FeatherWing.

Actually controlling the device with your own independent I2C device is something of a reverse engineering challenge, and mostly comes down to examining the ht16k33 library that controls it, along with the HT16K33 datasheet. Admittedly, I had a bit of assistance from Binho, but did have the “magical” binary combinations seen below written out on my bulletin board by the time they sent the info over.

The long and short of it is to begin with you’ll need to first scan the bus and target what you find on the GUI to communicate with the correct I2C device. Note that the device I’m using is listed by Adafruit as a 7-bit I2C address, while the Binho GUI expects an 8-bit. Scanning the bus will take care of this, but it may be different than you expect. I also had to toggle the pullup resistors to get things to work, but it seems this may be a glitch in the (very early revision) software that will be corrected. I then sent a couple commands to your ‘Wing to set things up:

  • 0b00100001 Wake up, note that “0b” indicates a binary number
  • 0b10000001 Turn on the display with no blinking
  • 0b10100000 Correctly setup output pins
  • 0b11101111 Set brightness to maximum

Alternatively, you can send these commands as the hex equivalents: 0x21, 0x81, 0xA0, and 0xEF.

GUI Input Example

With that done, you can turn individual segments on and off using binary or hex as you so desire. Each character is represented by 16 bits, corresponding to segments and a period between digits, and you need to enter a 1 for each segment you want on, 0 for those that need to be off. The first byte indicates the digit (0x00, 0x02, 0x04, 0x06 as each segment information is two bytes long). So 0x00 0b00000000 0b00000000 turns the first segment entirely off, which can also be expressed as 0x00 0x00 0x00 in all hex if you so prefer.

Looking at Adafruit’s LED backpack library, lines 88 through 181 shows how to construct a number of different characters in binary. Note here that information is entered least-significant bit first, so for instance the character 8, listed as: 0b0000000011111111, would be entered into the binho GUI as 0x00 0b11111111 0b00000000. Or this can also be expressed as 0x00 0xff 0x00 (0b and 0x indicating binary or hex numbers here), which is much easier to enter.

FeatherWing Doubler

Display on “doubler.” Characters produced with above GUI input

For a better looking setup with this type of product, binho also offers an adapter in the same form factor as the Adafruit FeatherWing series. In my case I just used Adafruit’s doubler product, which allowed me to plug in the binho adapter without any sort of extra jumper wiring. The connections are already lined up as far as data, power, clock and ground, so other than soldering the headers correctly and plugging everything in, there’s not much to worry about.

Once you’re done with Binho experimentation, an actual Adafruit dev board could be plugged in instead of the adapter board, allowing you to continue with whatever project you had in mind. Alternatively, you could test out other devices without the need for more soldering.

Going Further?

Using this adapter has been a fun learning experience for me, delving further into the I2C protocol, and experimenting with number formatting and reverse engineering. At $150, it’s not as cheap as hooking up an Arduino to just run whatever it is you’d like to power, but I can see this adapter being extremely useful in the following applications:

  1. A really excellent hands-on educational tool for I2C, as well as SPI, and general IO functions. I’ve learned a lot experimenting with it, and it could be used in a number of hands-on exercises. This could be useful to students new to physical computing altogether, to more advanced learners who are getting their hands around different protocol concepts.
  2. Low-run testing and QA device. As it just so happens the binho host adapter is extremely capable of going through a variety of automated routines via its Python library. I plan to do some experimentation with this in an upcoming post, so be sure to check back later to see how this develops!
  3. Advanced reverse engineering adapter. For instance if you’re trying to revive a display from the early 1980s or similar, having a direct link through the adapter rather than going through an ad hoc middleman (Arduino or otherwise) could make things much easier.

If you want to try out this product yourself, the adapter is available here, along with software and a number of accessories.

*Note that this article was paid for by Binho. That being said, it’s a really interesting product, and I’d certainly recommend the device if it fits your needs.

The post Binho Host Adapter with Adafruit Alphanumeric FeatherWing Display appeared first on JcoPro.net.

by Jeremy Cook at October 30, 2019 05:20 PM

Fabbaloo

Carbon's Manufacturing Strategy Continues

Carbon’s M2 3D printer [Source: Carbon]

Carbon’s M2 3D printer [Source: Carbon]

I’m reading a press release from a...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 30, 2019 03:31 PM

Additive World's Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2020

Additive World’s 2020 Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge [Source: Additive World]

Additive World’s 2020 Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge [Source: Additive World]

...

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by Kerry Stevenson at October 30, 2019 01:31 PM

3D Print.com

Link3D Completes Funding Round of $7 Million Led by Al Capital

Headquartered in Boulder, CO, Link3D is well-known for their Additive MES workflow software. Now, they have announced the completion of a $7 million round of venture capital funding led by... The...

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by Bridget O'Neal at October 30, 2019 01:00 PM

3D Systems Awarded Department of Defense Contract to Solve Navy Ship Corrosion Issues

Corrosion is inevitable when metal and other parts are exposed to the salt air—and especially routinely, as is the case for military ships and other hardware. The Department of Defense... The post...

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by Bridget O'Neal at October 30, 2019 12:39 PM

Fabbaloo

Sculpteo

3D Print.com

Researchers Recreate Hopping Disney/Pixar Lamp with 3D Printed Actuator

3D printing has previously been employed to create passive mechanisms and machines, as well as the actuators used to make them go. According to a new paper, titled “A Miniature... The post...

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by Sarah Saunders at October 30, 2019 08:39 AM

3D Printing in the Construction Industry: Still Evolving

In ‘Success Factors for 3D Printing Technology Adoption in Construction,” thesis student Pankhuri Pimpley at the University of Maryland, College Park, explores not only the history and benefits of...

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by Bridget O'Neal at October 30, 2019 07:27 AM

LiDar and its Applications Part 2 – Digital Elevation Modeling

This is a quick note on the basis of LiDar technology and Digital Elevation Analysis. It is the basis for various studies and industries. The post LiDar and its Applications Part 2 – Digital...

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by Ese Osaghae at October 30, 2019 07:18 AM

Effect of Newly Developed (Meth)acrylate Resins on Impact Strength in 3D Printing

The Challenge Dymax is creating solutions that allow photopolymer-based 3D printing resins to meet or exceed the capabilities of thermoplastic materials such as polycarbonate or ABS, targeting...

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by Team Dymax at October 30, 2019 06:12 AM

DSM & Twikit Collaborate: Designing 3D Printing Solutions for Healthcare, Automotive, Apparel

With offices based around the globe, Royal DSM is behind many innovative projects today meant to make a difference in fostering sustainability—as well as a 3D printing ecosystem wherever...

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by Bridget O'Neal at October 30, 2019 05:31 AM

Neighborhood 91: End-to-End 3D Printing Ecosystem at Pittsburgh International Airport

There are many 3D printing clusters around the world, specializing in areas like 3D bioprinting and research. But we’ve never seen one that includes all the elements of the AM... The post...

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by Sarah Saunders at October 30, 2019 05:06 AM

GE Research: Need for Speed in Computing to Integrate Artificial Intelligence and 3D Printing

“I feel the need…the need for speed!”   That iconic line was spoken by US Navy fighter pilots Maverick (Tom Cruise) and Goose (Anthony Edwards) in the 1986 action movie... The...

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by Sarah Saunders at October 30, 2019 05:00 AM